Saturday, May 26, 2018

L’Instant: an Immersive Dining Experience in Cannes


A selection of pictures from a breathtaking gastronomic adventure created by S.Pellegrino for the guests of the Cannes Film Festival.
http://bit.ly/2IP67SZ

S.Pellegrino Sapori Ticino 2018: The Grand Finale of Dinners


Be sure to book a table for the final spread of dinners in the closing month of this haute cuisine event where Michelin star chefs gather in Ticino, Switzerland
http://bit.ly/2LtHf56

Friday, May 25, 2018

A Must-Try Corn Casserole Recipe With A Mexican Twist


This Tex-Mex corn casserole recipe is comforting and delicious. It is great with a side of rice or chips. Don't forget the sour cream and guacamole! Try it now!
http://bit.ly/2IJLAzf

Italian Delicacies: Fontina Cheese


A look at Fontina Valdostana DOP, one of the noblest Italian cheese varieties produced in the Aosta Valley, a mountainous region in Northern Italy.
http://bit.ly/2IMqnVj

Cod with Chorizo, Tomatoes and Onions


The cod with chorizo, tomatoes and onions is a tasty and easy recipe to enjoy this fish in a heathy and versatile way.
http://bit.ly/2IMqn7L

Smoothie bowl with Mango, frozen Berries, grated Coconut and Mint


SMOOTHIE BOWL WITH MANGO, FROZEN BERRIES, GRATED COCONUT AND MINT





Healthy, nutrient and sweet: for breakfast or for a snack, try this delicious smoothie bowl!

INGREDIENTS

For the mango smoothie


To serve

INFO BOX

  • Preparation time - 15 m
  • Recipe category - Breakfast
  • Recipe yield - 4

PREPARATION


For the mango smoothie

Combine the mango, coconut milk, yogurt, lime juice, and agave nectar to a blender.

Blend on high until smooth.

Add the crushed ice and blend again for a further minute until smooth.

To serve

Divide the smoothie between bowls.

Top with the frozen berries, blueberries, coconut flakes, goji berries, and mint sprigs before serving.

http://bit.ly/2IJWpkG

Thursday, May 24, 2018

How To Cook Portobello Mushrooms For Maximum Flavor


HOW TO COOK PORTOBELLO MUSHROOMS FOR MAXIMUM FLAVOR





Meaty, juicy, and thick, portobello mushrooms are a hit with both meat lovers and vegetarians. They are a nutritional powerhouse but, naturally, the best reason to eat portobello mushrooms is that they are delicious and versatile. They may be enjoyed grilled, sautéed, stirred into risottos or soups, or as a topping for sandwiches and burgers. That's just the tip of the iceberg!

If you are a mushroom lover looking for new ways to cook portobello mushrooms then Fine Dining Lovers is here to share some of our favorite recipes.

STUFFED PORTOBELLO MUSHROOM RECIPES


Stuffed mushrooms make a superb appetizer for entertaining. They are easy to make and can be filled just about anything -from cheese and breadcrumbs to sausages, herbs, and more.

PORTOBELLO MUSHROOM CAPRESE



Pizza lovers will enjoy this portobello mushroom caprese recipe. The mushrooms are stuffed with cheese, herbs and tomatoes and baked until tender. Simply delicious!

EGG BAKED IN A PORTOBELLO MUSHROOM


Options for stuffing a portobello mushroom are basically endless but there is one particular use that may astound you: egg-stuffed portobello mushrooms! The trick is to pre-cook the mushroom before cracking an egg in it, thus preventing it from becoming too soggy.

GRILLED PORTOBELLO MUSHROOM RECIPES


Few things are as a delicious as a grilled portobello mushrooms. The basic grilling technique is simple: remove the stems, brush with oil and grill until browned on both sides and the mushrooms are tender.

Grilled mushrooms may be served as is, tossed with butter or with a zesty vinaigrette. But you can also get quite creative with grilled portobellos.

For instance, grilled portobello mushrooms may be added to a grilled vegetable lasagna (pictured below) or used as a bread substitute for sandwiches and burgers.

VEGAN PORTOBELLO MUSHROOM RECIPES


Portobello mushrooms are especially beloved by vegans because are a flavorful substitute for meat. Their texture works wonders either raw or cooked. Here are some recipe ideas you'll love:

VEGAN PORTOBELLO MUSHROOM PATÉ


Here is an easy vegan portobello mushroom paté recipe you can whip up in seconds:

Grind together 1 cup of walnuts, 3 portobello mushrooms (caps and stems), 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil, 1 tsp dried thyme, 1/2 tsp salt, and 2 garlic cloves. You've got yourself an easy vegan paté to enjoy with crackers, bread or as a dip.

VEGAN PORTOBELLO MUSHROOM STEAKS


Who says steaks have aren't for vegans? This recipe proves portobello mushroom can be transformed into a flavorful substitute for beef with just a few ingredients and a bit of creativity in the kitchen.

VEGAN MUSHROOM RISOTTO


For the ultimate vegan risotto blend portobellos with a blend of mushrooms. This will add complexity and depth of flavor to this Northern Italian classic.

PORTOBELLO MUSHROOM BURGER


There are two ways to enjoy a portobello mushroom burger: with a bun and without. First up, we have a wonderful vegetarian recipe for a portobello mushroom burger with a bun. The juicy grilled portobello mushroom is topped with strips of mango and bean sprouts for extra crunch.



For the gluten-free route you'll want to use grilled portobello mushroom caps as a bun. Lightly coat the portobello mushroom caps with oil and grill on medium heat until browned on both sides.



http://bit.ly/2II4f2z

The Rise of Regional Cuisine in Moscow


THE RISE OF REGIONAL CUISINE IN MOSCOW


Moscow is seeing more pop-ups by chefs from different regions in Russia than ever before. Discover why regional Russian cuisine is conquering the capital.

The Rise of Regional Cuisine in Moscow

Anyone who looks at a map of Russia will understand that the inhabitants of such a vast territory cannot cook in the same way. Until recently, in Moscow it was mainly people who moved to the capital from outside that were more familiar with the gastronomical differences across Russia than those living there.

However, in recent years the situation has begun to change, and regional Russian cuisine is rising in Moscow for many reasons. Here, we discuss three of the most significant.

FOOD EMBARGO


Firstly, in August 2014, in response to European sanctions over Ukraine, the Russian Government introduced a ban on the import of many products from EU countries, the United States, Canada and Australia. The ‘banned list’ included meat, fish, vegetables, fruits, nuts and dairy products. The banned products were used mostly in restaurants, so Russian chefs were forced to investigate and exploredomestic products more thoroughly.

But, the concept of ‘local product’ in a country that is 10,000km by 4000km is different from how it is generally perceived in other parts of the world. In normal terms, it doesn't suit the definition of locavorism as seen for example in California or Italy. But all these ingredients are traditional and Russian. Of course, the best way to find good quality products is for chefs to go to the regions in which they are produced.



In Moscow, chefs use ingredients from all over Russia: far Eastern seafood (shrimps, scallops, oysters and Kamchatka crab), pineapple guava and persimmon from Southern Russia, watermelons from Astrakhan, reindeer from Yakutia, honey from Altai, and fish from Siberian rivers. The hardest part is the cheese. There are traditions of cheese making in Russia, but different from European ones. Difficulties with cheeses led many chefs to establish their own cheese production in the restaurants. Some new restaurants even built a concept around their own creamery.

OPENNESS TO EXPERIMENTATION


Restaurant diners and foodies have become more open to new tastes and flavours, no matter where they come from, Peru or the Russian hinterland.

The same can be said for the exotic ingredients of central Russia – whether it's marinated ferns, smoked dried Cherkessia pear, northern berries (cloudberry, Arctic raspberry, blueberry) or Dagestan urbech (a paste made from ground nuts or seeds and sugar). Russian products are becoming trendy thanks also to the efforts of entrepreneurs, chefs and the press, and even restaurants with ‘European-style’ fine dining are beginning to indicate the origin of tomatoes and herring on the menu.



Moscow foodies have been able to taste more of these local products over the last two years through an increasing number of pop-ups of chefs from different regions, including from Rostov-na-Donu(Anton Kochura from classical and classy fine dining restaurant Onegin Dacha), Vladivostok (Egor Anisimov from the ever popular Zuma), Krasnodar (Andrei Matuha, chef of UgliUgli and The Pech, who will represent Russia this June at the Bocuse d’Or Europe in Turin), Sochi (Andrei Kolodyazhny), and Tula (Mikhail Lukashonok from Mark and Lev, the only real locavore restaurant in Russia) have all cooked in the capital.

In 2017 there were two big initiatives – one organised by the Karlson restaurant, the second by Chefshow by Novikov (the cooking school, which is the part of business of well-known Russian restaurateur Arkady Novikov), and some ‘non-series’ dinners (the biggest was organised on Polar Explorer’s Day and brought eight chefs from Moscow and eight from all over Russia together). All the chefs tried to present the best recipes and ingredients from their native lands. For example, Egor Anisimov cooked exotic for Moscow sea cucumber and ascidium, Andrei Matuha — black pudding from Kuban, and Andrei Kolodyazhny – buns with palm flour (from palms that are cultivated in Sochi).

NEW OPENINGS IN MOSCOW


Thirdly, regional restaurateurs have now accumulated enough experience and energy to reach the most challenging market in the country.

Tahir Holikberdiev, from Krasnodar, first opened a meat-centric restaurant, Scotina (The Beast) in his hometown, which became famous far beyond the city limits. He went on to open a restaurant in Moscow, Yuzhane, which translates as ‘Southerners’ in English reflecting the regional influence on the restaurant. Tahir works with meat producers in southern Russia, sourcing all the beef for his restaurants from the Krasnodar region. He is also trying to introduce Moscow foodies to traditional products and recipes from southern Russia. On the menu, you can find a cowbyk (a kind of souse loaf, pork meat and offal boiled in a pig's stomach) and a burger with nutria. He has also opened a fast-casual restaurant in Moscow, Butcher's Pie.



At the end of 2017 restaurant KU by Denis Ivanov appeared in Moscow. Denis owns about 30 restaurants in Novosibirsk and made his debut in Moscow with a very successful ramen izakaya. His next project will be #SiberiaSiberia, a branch of the restaurant in Novosibirsk with mostly Siberian cuisine — pelmeni, sugudai (a dish of raw river fish), stroganina, beetroot salad with smoked muksun, etc.

Additionally, Andrei Kolodyazhny is expected to open a new restaurant in Moscow soon (the name and exact date are still unknown). One of the most notable chefs outside the two capitals, he left his restaurant Baran-Rapan in Sochi, where he cooked herbs growing in the surrounding mountains, and apparently will continue to cook the same style of cuisine in Moscow.

Finally, wine restaurant Touché has launched a series of dinners called 'Expedition', inviting chef-bartender teams. In March and April, they presented dinners by chef Andrey Fedoseyev and bartender Dmitry Boychenko from Vladivostok gastropub Old Fashioned, as well as chef Anton Ivnitsky and bartender Artyom Ataulov from the restaurant Matrëshki and gastropub Before.

http://bit.ly/2x7Yy8t

7 Must Try Dishes from Ethiopian Cuisine


7 MUST TRY DISHES FROM ETHIOPIAN CUISINE





Ethiopian food is a wonderful mix of generous vegetable based dishes and spicy meat stews which are usually eaten communually and by hand.

Do you know some typical Ethiopian dishes? Here's a non-exhaustive list to give you a taste of this hearty east African cuisine.

Ethiopian Foods


THE BASIC ELEMENTS OF ETHIOPIAN CUISINE


1. Injera




If there is one thing you need to know about Ethiopian cuisine, it's Injera. From morning to night, this thick and spongy cake, usually made from teff flour, is the basis of most dishes. The dough is fermented for 1 to 3 days, which gives it a very characteristic bittersweet taste. Injera are served entirely flat on the plate with various small portions of sauces and other dishes heaped on top. By scooping up the injera with the delicious toppings by hand all is eaten together and the Injera serves as a dish, cutlery and bread!

2. Berbere


Berbere is an essential building block of food in Ethiopia. In reality, Berbere is not a dish atall, but an accompaniment made up of spices. It's a combination of garlic, peppers, coriander, cinnamon, cumin and ginger.

3. Niter kibbeh


Finally, we often find niter kibbeh on the table, a kind of butter cooked in garlic, onions, spices and ginger, before being clarified.

2. TYPICAL DISHES OF ETHIOPIAN CUISINE

1. Wat




Meat wat can be prepared with goat, chicken (the most common), beef or mutton. Vegetable wat is usually made from mashed beans, lentils, beans, spinach or carrots.

2. Kefto


Kefto is the tartar of Ethiopian cuisine, made of raw meat crushed and seasoned with Berbere.

3. Yetsom Beyaynetu


This is an assortment of vegetables served on Injera.

4. Siga tibs


Siga tibs is a grilled meat (beef, goat or sheep) dish served in kibbe niter.

5. Maheberawi


The Maheberawi is a mixed plate of meats such as wat, siga tibs or kefto, placed ontop of the Injera.

http://bit.ly/2IHO3yg

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Food Events: What's on in June 2018


FOOD EVENTS: WHAT'S ON IN JUNE 2018





With summer fast approaching, it’s time to look ahead to the biggest food events around the world in June.

It’s a packed schedule of eating and drinking for curious foodies, with plenty of opportunities to get out and about and watch some of the world’s top chefs in action, and taste their food of course.

Here are our pick of the best food events this June.

FOOD EVENTS: JUNE 2018

WELCOME CONFERENCE, NEW YORK, 4 JUNE


Now in its fourth year, the one-day Welcome Conference, hosted by Eleven Madison Park’s Will Guidara, along with Anthony Rudolf and Brian Canlis, and supported by S.Pellegrino, aims to bring hospitality people together to discuss the biggest issues facing the industry – and to leave inspired. This year’s line-up at New York’s Lincoln Center includes Dan Barber and Lara Gilmore, as well as stars from the world of entertainment, who will be talking on the theme of ‘Restoration.’ Tickets are sold out but you can join the waiting list here.
GOURMET DAYS, ST PETERSBURG, 5 TO 9 JUNE

Gourmet Days, sponsored by S.pellegrino and Acqua Panna, returns to St Petersburg with a line-up of top chefs from all over the world, including Anthony Genovese, Will Horowitz and Garima Arora, who will be joined by the Russian city’s top culinary ambassadors for a series of dinners and discussions designed to put St Petersburg on the culinary world map. Find out more.

ITA–DAKI–MAS AT WHISK, HONG KONG, 8 AND 9 JUNE




Another spectacular dinner, as part of the Fine Lovers Guest Chef Series by S.Pellegrino and Acqua Panna, this time sees chef Taku Tabuchi of Tokyo’s S’accapau take over the kitchen of Hong Kong’s Whisk at The Mira hotel for two nights. Having trained in Europe, before heading back to his native Japan, Tabuchi will bring together the best Italian and Japanese ingredients for a six-course dinner, with fine wines chosen by sommelier Seju. Find out more.

VERO BEACH WINE AND FILM FESTIVAL, FLORIDA, 7 TO 10 JUNE




Vero Beach Wine + Film Festival - 2018 from Vero Beach Wine Film Festival on Vimeo.

Wine, the beach, and films – sounds perfect doesn’t it and visitors to this idyllic sounding four day event will have their pick of over 100 wines from around the world to taste and over 75 award-winning films, including several US premieres, as well as the chance to dine with directors and enjoy special dinners by the sea. Plenty of opportunity then, to pair the perfect wine and cinema experience. Find out more.

BOCUSE D’OR EUROPE, TURIN, 11 AND 12 JUNE




The next leg of the Bocuse d’Or regional finals sponsored by S.Pellegrino, focusing on Europe, will take place in Turin, with 20 countries competing for just 10 places at the Grand Final in Lyon in January 2018. Expect stunning creativity and a lively atmosphere as the teams look to book their place at the Olympics of Gastronomy. Find out more.

FOOD AND WINE CLASSIC, ASPEN, 15 TO 17 JUNE




The annual food fest in the Colorado Rockies, sponsored by S.Pellegrino always attracts big name chefs and this year is no exception, with the likes of Jacques Pépin, Curtis Stone, Rick Bayless, Stephanie Izard, and Ludo Lefebvre in attendance. Foodies can enjoy a whole host of seminars, cooking demos, dinners and workshops, set against a stunning backdrop. Find out more.

WORLD’S 50 BEST RESTAURANTS 2018, BILBAO, 17 TO 19 JUNE




The world’s most talked about restaurants list, sponsored by S.Pellegrino and Acqua Panna, is heading to the Basque Country this year. Ahead of the awards ceremony itself on 19 June, a series of events will be taking place in the region, including a #50BestTalks event featuring seven of the world’s best chefs, in San Sebastian, and a special Art and Food Conversation presented by S.Pellegrino at the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, along with a reveal of its new design project The Journey of Water. Find out more.

SAPORI TICINO




Early summer marks the end of S.Pellegrino’s Sapori Ticino 2018 in Switzerland, a series of dinners bringing together chefs with a combined 210 Michelin stars between them. But don’t worry; there are still a few delicious evenings to go, including dinners featuring the likes of chefs Norbert Niederkofler (Hotel Rosa Alpina) and Søren Selin (AOC, Copenhagen). But be quick , as they are selling out fast! Find out more.

TASTE EVENTS


Keep an eye out for Taste events in cities all around the world in early summer, including in London, Amsterdam, Dublin and Moscow. These huge gastronomical extravaganzas draw some of the world’s best chefs and local talent, with similarly large crowds to match. Cooking demonstrations, workshops, markets and special events in restaurants around host cities mean these food festivals are not to be missed.

http://bit.ly/2x4qlXo

The Best Chocolate Chip Cookies: 3 Ways To Get It Right


THE BEST CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES: 3 WAYS TO GET IT RIGHT





What's the secret to the best chocolate chip cookie? That depends on who you ask. Some people like their chocolate chip cookies thin and crispy while others opt for a fluffier cookie with melt-in-your-mouth chocolate chips.

Then there is the butter versus margarine debate. Let's not even get into the gluten-free varieties out there. So it is clear: what constitutes the best chocolate chip cookie is simply a matter of personal taste.

With that in mind we've rounded up our favorite recipes that yield the best chocolate chip cookies - whether you like them soft and chewy, crispy and think, or without any grain or dairy. Take your pick below!

CAKEY CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES



Sarah Carey from Everyday Food shows you how to make the perfect cakey chocolate chip cookiesperfect for dunking in a tall glass of milk. The recipe calls for butter, all-purpose flour, white sugar and light brown sugar, eggs and vanilla extract.

THIN AND CRISPY CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES




The secret to these thin and crispy chocolate chip cookies is the addition of vegetable shortening. Divas Can Cook details the full cooking process which involves pressing the cookies before baking to enhance their crisping abilities.

GLUTEN-FREE AND DAIRY-FREE CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES




Rice flour and cornmeal are the base of this gluten-free cookie that is prepared with margarine and dairy-free chocolate chips.

Get the recipe here.




http://bit.ly/2ID24Nu

L’Instant: an Immersive Dining Experience in Cannes

A selection of pictures from a breathtaking gastronomic adventure created by S.Pellegrino for the guests of the Cannes Film Festival. http:/...