Thursday, August 16, 2018

40+ Chefs Speaking at Food on the Edge 2018


40+ CHEFS SPEAKING AT FOOD ON THE EDGE 2018


PHOTO ROBBIE REYNOLDS


Food on the Edge sponsored by S.Pellegrino returns on 22 and 23 October, with some of the biggest names in food heading to Galway on Ireland’s rugged West Coast for the two day symposium.

Over 50 top chefs and food leaders will be speaking at the event, which this year takes ‘Conversations’ as one if its central themes, alongside the ‘Future of Food,’ as a way to expand on some of the issues raised at previous editions.

Speaking at the event’s national launch in Dublin, chef and organiser JPMcMahon said: “I think it’s very good to sometimes talk through some of the issues and the problems, whether they are mental health, food waste, or education on the chef’s side and also the food education of our children, and that plays into who we are as a society.”

Early bird tickets priced at €300 are still available for the event until 31 August.

Speakers this year include Albert Adria of Tickets, Ana Roš of Hiša Franko, Andoni Luis Adurizof Mugaritz, Clare Smyth of Core, Malena Martinez of Mater Iniciativa, Matt Orlando of Amassand Will Goldfarb of Room 4 Dessert.

See the full list of confirmed speakers, which is subject to change and additions, below.

FOOD ON THE EDGE 2018 LINE-UP


  • Aidan McGee, Corrigan’s, London
  • Albert Adria, Tickets, Barcelona
  • Ana Roš, Hiša Franko, Slovenia
  • Andoni Luis Aduriz, Mugaritz, San Sebastian
  • Anita Hayes, Irish Seed Savers
  • Andy McFadden, Glovers Alley by Andy McFadden, Dublin
  • Arlette Eulert & Malena Martinez, Matria, Peru
  • Alexandre Silva, LOCO, Lisbon
  • Carri Thurman & Sharon Roufa, Two Sisters Bakery, Homer, Alaska
  • Clare Smyth, Core by Clare Smyth, London
  • Conor Spacey, Chef’s Manifesto, Dublin
  • Diana Henry, Food Writer
  • Didier Ferilati, co-director de Fuego Amigo consultaría
  • Douglas McMaster, Silo, Brighton
  • Duncan Welgemoed, Africola, Adelaide, Australia
  • Emma Bengtsson, Aquavit, NYC
  • Eric Vildgaard, Restaurant Jordnaer, Denmark
  • Esben Holmboe Bang & Halaigh Whelan-McManus, Maaemo, Norway
  • 
Hans Neuner, Ocean Restaurant, Portugal
  • Helena Puolakka, Aster, London
  • James Whetlor & Jonathan Woolway, Goatober, London
  • Jeremy Chan & Iré Hassan-Odukale, Ikoyi, London

  • Joe Warwick, Where Chefs Eat
  • Jorge Vallejo, Quintonil, Mexico City
  • Joshna Maharaj, chef/speaker/activist, Toronto
  • Joshua Smith, Moody’s Delicatessen & Provisions, Boston
  • Julie Dupouy, Down2Wine, Ireland
  • Kemal Demirasal, Alancha, Istanbul
  • Kevin Burke, The Ninth, London
  • Lars Williams, Empirical Spirits, Denmark
  • Lauren Singer, Trash Is For Tossers, NYC
  • Luke French, Joro, Sheffield
  • Marguerite Keogh, The Five Fields, London
  • Mark Anderson, Gather & Gather, Dublin
  • Matt Orlando, Amass, Copenhagen
  • Nathan Outlaw, Restaurant Nathan Outlaw, Cornwall, UK
  • Neven Maguire, MacNean House & Restaurant, Ireland
  • Niall Davidson, Nuala, London
  • Nicolai Ellitsgaard Pedersen, Under, Norway
  • Nicolas Min JØrgensen, Substans, Aarhus, Denmark
  • Nicolai Nørregaard, Kadeau, Copenhagen
  • Norbert Niederkofler, St. Hubertus, Dolomites, Italy

  • Pádraic Óg Gallagher, The Boxty House, Dublin

  • Paul Cunningham, Henne Kerkebe Kro, Denmark
  • Paul Finkelstein, Eat Fit, Canada
  • Paul Ivic, Tian, Vienna
  • Sasu Laukkonen, Ora, Helsinki
  • Shauna & Mark Froydenlund, Marcus Restaurant, London
  • 
Skye Gyngell, Spring Restaurant, London
  • Vladimir Mukhin, White Rabbit, Moscow
  • Will Goldfarb, Room4Dessert, Bali

Why People Are Leaving 100% Tips on Bills


WHY PEOPLE ARE LEAVING 100% TIPS ON BILLS


PHOTO PEXELS


As many in the food world contemplate whether it would be better to eliminate tipping altogether, a new trend is emerging on social media: tipping 100% on bills.

Hundreds of people have recently taken up the #tipthebillchallenge in restaurants, posting their receipts to social media, in solidarity with servers – who have also been sharing the evidence.

As you can see, to take the challenge you have to match the total of the bill with gratuity, with people leaving some pretty hefty tips that have been making servers' days.


So far, the #tipthebillchallenge is largely a US thing, where there is already a strong tipping culture, so it will be interesting to see whether it spreads to other parts of the world too.
THIS RESTAURANT WANTS YOU TO TIP THE COOK

Mango and Chia Pudding


MANGO AND CHIA PUDDING




An easy recipe to make a delicious mango and chia pudding with vanilla and macadamia nuts: try it for breakfast.

INGREDIENTS


For the chia pudding

Milk - 600 ml
Vanilla yogurt - 400 g, stirred
Agave nectar - 2 tbsp, light
Chia seeds - 120 g

For the mango purée

  • Mango - 3 ripe, halved, pitted, peeled, diced
  • Lemon juice - 1/2

To serve

  • Macadamia nuts - 2 tbsp, roughly chopped

INFO BOX

  • Preparation time - 8 h 45 m
  • Recipe category - Breakfast
  • Recipe yield - 4
PREPARATION

For the chia pudding
Whisk together the milk, yogurt, and agave nectar in a mixing bowl.
Add the chia seeds, whisk again, and leave to stand for 30 minutes.

For the mango purée
In the meantime, combine the mango and lemon juice in a food processor.
Blend on high until smooth and puréed. Divide between four serving glasses.
Cover and chill until needed.
After the chia pudding has stood for 30 minutes, give it a quick stir.
Spoon on top of the mango purée in the glasses, cover with clingfilm, and chill overnight.

To serve

When ready to serve, garnish the puddings with chopped macadamias.

Black Sapote: The Fruit That Tastes Like Chocolate Pudding


BLACK SAPOTE: THE FRUIT THAT TASTES LIKE CHOCOLATE PUDDING




Pick a fruit, cut it in half, dip a spoon in it and have the sensation of tasting a good chocolate cake. That's the promise of the black sapote, a delicious fruit from Central America that tastes like chocolate pudding but with fewer calories.

Interested in knowing more? Fine Dining Lovers tells you everything you need to know about chocolate pudding fruit.


WHAT IS BLACK SAPOTE?




Black sapote is a green-skinned fruit with black, sticky pulp. It is commonly called chocolate pudding fruit. It is popular in Central America, and it is found mainly in Mexico, the Dominican Republic, Cuba and Guatemala.

The black sapote has the peculiarity of having the taste and the color of the chocolate, but with way fewer calories: 45 for 100 grams (compared to 530 calories for 100 grams of chocolate).

Another advantage? This chocolate pudding fruit is rich in vitamins A and C. In Central America, a kilo of black sapotes costs around 2 euros.

HOW TO EAT BLACK SAPOTE?

The black sapote can be eaten exactly as it is, with a spoon, or as a substitute for chocolate in many recipes. For example, it can be prepared in mousse, cake, smoothies or cookies. You'll love experimenting with this chocolate pudding fruit!

The Best New Restaurant in the US No-One Knows About


THE BEST NEW RESTAURANT IN THE US NO-ONE KNOWS ABOUT




The best new restaurant in the US is a small 22-seat tasting menu spot serving Nordic-inspired, local fare in Oklahoma, according to Bon Appétit magazine.

Nonesuch, in Oklahoma City, has taken the top spot on the magazine’s annual The Hot 10, a list of the 10 best new restaurants in the US, as chosen by two of the publication’s senior staff.

The trio of chefs behind it, all under 30 and with little formal training, forage many of the ingredients for their 10-course, $75 tasting menu locally, but by all accounts, the restaurant is perpetually half full. Not for much longer.

Watch a video introduction to the restaurant below.



Bon Appetit’s Editor-at-Large Andrew Knowlton had this to say about falling in love with Nonesuch: "Its chefs have mastered how to incorporate hyper-local and foraged ingredients in a landlocked state, how to minimally yet artfully plate each dish, and how to express an undying love of all things fermented, pickled, and cured. This is the place that will put OKC on the national dining map."

See the full Hot 10 below.


1. Nonesuch (Oklahoma City)
2. Maydan (Washington, D.C.)
3. Ugly Baby Brooklyn
4. Freedman’s (Los Angeles)
5. Nyum Bai (Oakland, CA)
6. Nimblefish (Portland, OR)
7. Che Fico (San Francisco)
8. Yume Ga Arukara (Cambridge, MA)
9. Drifter’s Wife (Portland, ME)
10. Call (Denver)

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

A Beginner's Guide to American BBQ


A BEGINNER'S GUIDE TO AMERICAN BBQ


In the United States barbecue is more than just a style of cooking. From saucy smoked ribs, to pulled pork and brisket, here are some BBQ tips and tricks.
A Beginner's Guide to American BBQ

Do you know barbecue? Barbecue is a term that is often thrown around and can mean different things. The main distinction is whether it’s a noun or a verb. As a verb, it can mean just about anything that is cooked on a grill, gas-powered or charcoal. Burgers on a grill, kebabs, steak, chicken wings, fish, asparagus, even pineapple. But if you say that you are going to eat barbecue, if that verb “to barbecue” becomes a noun then, for Americans at least, this can only mean one thing.

Low-and-slow charcoal and wood-smoked meats. The kind that are smoked for up to eighteen hours, over woods like hickory, apple, mesquite, or cherry, smothered in dry rub (a mixture of spices, often including chili, pepper, paprika, sugar, celery salt, cumin and much more), and perhaps (but only perhaps) topped with a sticky, smoky, spicy, sweet barbecue sauce with a base of molasses (if you’re in the Kansas City area) or vinegar (around North Carolina).

It’s southern food, but you’ll find incredible versions of it in the American Midwest and in Texas. Each region has its specialty. Texas is known for beef, and the most famous cut of beef is brisket, the breast of the cow, the toughest, stringiest, chewiest piece you can find. That is, until you smoked the hell out of it for eighteen hours, after which its shell is blackened, but the meat falls apart, flaking like rare salmon, with a taste that’s… well… the stuff of dreams.

A MATTER OF TIME


Having lived for many years in Europe, American smoked barbecue is the food that I miss most and find least often. You can get good barbecue. But the great stuff? Almost never on this side of the Atlantic. The difference is in the time - I’m tempted to say the laziness of the chef.

Great barbecue must be smoked with love and patience. You can get a barbecue-y flavor by smoking meat for two hours and finishing it on the grill, using heavy doses of barbecue sauce and even a dash of “liquid smoke,” a product that injects smokiness (it is a potion made of a smoked soy sauce, among other ingredients) without the meat having necessarily been exposed to, you know, smoke.

But the “bark” of great barbecue, the flesh infused with flavor throughout, the falling-off-the-hone texture, are signs of the real deal. Slowly smoked meat, suspended off-set from the heat source, enriched by the smoke from wood chips infusing and softening it for as much as 18 hours.

3 MAIN AMERICAN BARBECUE CATEGORIES


For those unfamiliar with American-style barbecue, there here are three categories you might try.

Texas Brisket: The king of American barbecue categories, the least-desired piece of a cow transforms into smoky, buttery unctuousness when smoked over woodchips for, say, 18 hours. The outside “bark” is blackened and crisp, the inside melty and… I’m getting hungry just writing this.



Carolina Pulled Pork: Cook a hunk of fatty meat long enough and it falls apart. Cover said meat in a dry rub of mixed spices, tear it apart with forks, douse it in sauce (vinegar-based, since this is the Carolinas) and stick it in a sandwich.

Kansas City Ribs: Legend has it that Henry Perry, circa 1900, first served slow-smoked meat in Kansas City, and the approach he used launched one of the great barbecue centers of the world. What distinguishes KC barbecue from others is the use of a sauce that contains tomato and molasses (as opposed to Carolina sauces, which are vinegar-based, and Texas barbecue, where you can get sauce, but the focus is on the dry rub and, it’s said, the best barbecue doesn’t “need” the addition of sauce.) A rack of smoked ribs, varnished with sauce, is about as good as it gets.

But I think my favorite is burnt ends. These are chunks of smoked brisket that are coated in barbecue sauce and re-smoked, tucked back into the heat to get another crunchy, caramelized layer of amazingness.

ESSENTIAL BARBECUE TOOLS


Think about grilling, and you’ll likely picture a kettle grill: round with coals on the bottom, a grate above and a top to cover it. We’re not going to focus on gas grills. Though these are fine, purists will say that a burger or steak cooked with gas never tastes as good as one made with charcoal, and I’d tend to agree. You also will not be able to smoke as well with a gas grill, so we’ll set those aside for now.



The trend these days is for kamado-style ovens, that can be used as convection ovens, smokers, grills, heck even pizza ovens. Kamado refers to a charcoal of wood-fueled stove in Japanese, but it is more specifically a “place for the cauldron,” as in the spot where heat is produced over which you suspend your cooking vessel. A portable clay kamado, mushikamado, was spotted by Americans after World War Two and adopted and adapted. As with an Indian Tandoori oven, the egg shape helps distribute heat, but the real key is that the oven is made of ceramic, which retains heat beautifully, for hours on a modest portion of charcoal.

This is an oven, not strictly a grill or a smoker, but it can be used as any of the above, and is therefore wonderfully versatile. It is also the most ancient form of portable oven, with examples likewise made of clay, found in archaeological excavations in India, Japan, even in Africa and South America. The consistent theme is the oblong shape and ceramic walls.

There is no manlier way to cook than to use a giant knife to dismember slabs of beasts and drop them only pillars of flame and pillows of smoke. Barbecue is manly food (though beloved of all ages and genders): grill and smoke, rub and sauce. Whatever your budget, there’s an option out there. And if you’re unfamiliar with the wonders of true American smoked barbecue, perhaps one of the only truly American cooking styles, then now is the time for your baptism by blue smoke.

Food Superstitions: Does Placing Bread Upside Down on the Table Give Bad Luck?


FOOD SUPERSTITIONS: DOES PLACING BREAD UPSIDE DOWN ON THE TABLE GIVE BAD LUCK?





We must not put elbows on the table, cut the salad or toast with wine ... At the table, the rules of good manners and superstitions are many, sometimes misunderstood and often related to historical contexts. This is the case of upside-down bread on the table.

According to legend, an upside-down loaf can bring bad luck and draw the evil eye on the guests present at the table...But why?

CAN UPSIDE-DOWN BREAD BRING BAD LUCK?


This superstition dates from the Medieval era. At the time, bandits received public capital punishment according to the gravity of their crime.

To execute them, an executioner was called in. On the day of the execution, the executioner did not have time to swing by the bakery to pick up his daily loaf of bread. Thus, the baker would reserve a loaf for the executioner. In order to distinguish this bread from the rest the baker would turn one loaf upside down. Customers, aware of this distinction, avoided touching the bread in question for fear of catching the evil eye.

This is how upside-down bread was associated with misfortune. And if a Christian accidentally touched the bread, he had to mark it with a cross with a knife before eating it. Nowadays, putting the baguette facing right-side up is enough!
15 CRAZY FOOD SUPERSTITIONS FROM AROUND THE WORLD


SUPERSTITIONS ABOUT CHILI PEPPERS

Sushi Master Shares 10 Steps to Perfect Nigiri


SUSHI MASTER SHARES 10 STEPS TO PERFECT NIGIRI


PHOTO SUSHI NAKAZAWA


You may recognise the sushi master in the video below, from the seminal food film, Jiro Dreams of Sushi.

His name is Daisuke Nakazawa, and having trained under Japan’s most famous sushi master, Jiro Ono, for many years, he then moved to New York, to open high end sushi spot Sushi Nakazawa, widely considered to be one of the best sushi restaurants in the US.

There, he’s developed a style he calls 'New York-mae,' which adapts edo-mae style sushi to New York tastes, using lots of local products and veering away from strict sushi traditions where necessary, over a 20-course omakase ('Chefs's choice') menu.

As well as talking about his time with Ono, Nakazawa has a load of tips to share in the video below from First We Feast, from how to butcher fish to the importance of using fresh wasabi and ginger.

He also offers a 10-step guide to how to make the perfect nigiri, from ensuring your fingers are moist enough to how to shape the rice correctly, which ultimately will effect mouth feel.

Take a look below.
LET JIRO ONO TEACH YOU HOW TO EAT SUSHI CORRECTLY

Sofía Cortina’s Fruit Driven Desserts


S
OFÍA CORTINA’S FRUIT-DRIVEN DESSERTS

Fruit is the star of the young Mexican pastry chef's elegant desserts, from Mexican tamales to Japanese and French-inspired delicacies.

Sofía Cortina’s Fruit-Driven Desserts

Sofia Cortina grew up in a family where savoury food was simply considered the long route to dessert. At 18, she found her calling. She abandoned traditional schooling to work at Chef Enrique Olvera’s Pujol Restaurant, where she discovered her passion for baking. She later became an apprentice at EspaiSucre in Barcelona, before a stint with Pierre Hermé in Paris.

Today, at the age of 26, her talent has taken her to Dubai, Ibiza, London and, of course, Mexico City, where she has become well-known thanks to her current project: Hotel Carlota’s bakery.

Cortina’s striking creations have attracted great attention, as well as transcending culinary boundaries. Her desserts are delicately balanced landscapes, boasting incredible aesthetics and flavours, and range from delicate to stimulating.
FROM IMAGINATION TO REALITY

Since taking over Hotel Carlota's kitchen, she has enjoyed the freedom to realise her ideas, starting with the mamey mousse with chocolate ganache and Flor de Cacao. “I imagined a dessert in the cacao family and knew I wanted to create light desserts with varying textures,” she says.



“In Mexico, sweets are everywhere, starting with the traditional meringues sold in the streets. So, it’s not easy to moderate Mexican diners’ sugar consumption,” explains Cortina. “Everyone is used to an intense level of 'sweetness'.” Even though it’s been a challenge to minimise or eliminate the use of sugar, Sofia has managed to create exceptional desserts.
EXTRAVAGANT AND CONTRASTING FLAVOURS

Sofia Cortina stands out thanks to her creativity and extravagant combinations. Perhaps her boldest dessert is avocado ice cream, which was a huge success right from the start.

Her 'signature pastries' are Vacherines: Cortina puts her spin on the French dessert, with ethereal layers of meringue, coulis and light sorbets. She also prepares an amazing dish with summer cacti, a combination of exotic ingredients like pitahaya, dragon fruit, crystallised xoconostle – nopal fruit, in a delicate play on acidity.


FROM MEXICO TO JAPAN

Her creations reflect her masterful technique, which has been influenced by different pastry traditions.

She uses traditional Mexican methods like nixtamalisation (working criollo corn for plum tamales) and tatemado (scorching plantains or peaches, which she likes to pair with almond ice cream and olive oil).

She learned the foundations of Japanese pastry tradition from Takeshi Somekawa at Dos Palillos in Barcelona, where she also fell in love with matcha and mochi, the typical Japanese dessert made with glutinous rice flour. “I love the precision and accuracy that sets the Japanese apart,” she says. In the restaurant, she works it by hand and often fills it with yogurt, raspberry or rose chantilly ice cream.


PAS-DE-DEUX

Sofía Cortina and Joaquín Cardoso – two of Pujol’s prodigal sons – have developed a balanced rhythm in the Hotel Carlota. They share the same philosophy: quality ingredients, freshness, lots of French technique and well-structured flavours. “Without a doubt, Joaquín motivated me to focus on the product. We consider cuisine as a whole, using fresh daily ingredients,” says Cortina.

Cortina is enjoying a successful period in her career, and together with Cardoso is about to launch a new project in Mexico City. She hints that “there will be 1920s-style French desserts with local ingredients and a very tropical twi
st.”

Tuesday, August 14, 2018

How To Freeze Raspberries


HOW TO FREEZE RASPBERRIES





Throughout the summer, the raspberry delights us with its pleasant acidity and lightness. So when autumn comes around we are already longing for its return the following year. Why wait so long, when it is possible to enjoy the sweetness of raspberries all year round?

We explain to you how to freeze raspberries so you can use them decorate your yogurts and to make pretty pies without waiting for the next summer.

HOW TO FREEZE RASPBERRIES?


The first thing to know is that raspberries will be relatively well preserved provided you follow some instructions.



The first is to never freeze the raspberries directly on a tray because they risk sticking together. If the raspberries freeze into a solid mass it will be impossible to use them individually for decorating a white chocolate and raspberry tart, for example, as you will only be able to use as a "mush" over yogurt or ice cream.

To keep them intact, start by washing them and drying them, before spreading them on a plate covered with cling film. Place this plate in the freezer and when the raspberries are frozen, pack them away in a plastic container or in a freezer bag to occupy less space.

You can use them throughout the winter, until the following summer!



If you love raspberries, don't miss these 12 recipes that make the most of this summer berry.

10 Instant Pot Recipes For Quick and Easy Meals


10 INSTANT POT RECIPES FOR QUICK AND EASY MEALS


PHOTO INSTANTPOT/INSTAGRAM


There's no doubt the Instant Pot, and other electric pressure cookers on the market, have come to revolutionize everyday cooking. You can make virtually anything in them - from fall-off-the-bone meat and chicken to steamed seafood, veggies, and even dessert.

Aside from speed, the Instant Pot allows for lots of hands-free cooking and limits cleanup to just one pot. It's quite an asset in the kitchen and if you've been wondering what to make the Instant Pot check out the recipes below for some great inspiration:

INSTANT POT BEEF STEW




Beef stew is a classic recipe that is most beloved and time consuming. It can be ready in under 45 minutes thanks to the Instant Pot.

INSTANT POT SHREDDED CHICKEN



This easy recipe yields shredded chicken that you can use in everything from tacos and burritos to salads and soups.

INSTANT POT GARLIC PARMESAN CHICKEN

 
A creamy garlic Parmesan sauce makes everyday chicken completely irresistible. You could even cook the pasta in the Instant Pot!

INSTANT POT CHICKEN AND DUMPLINGS

 
Chicken and dumplings are a comfort food staple. Making it in the Instant Pot ensure perfection every time.

INSTANT POT SALMON AND STEAMED VEGETABLES

 
In just 10 minutes you can this complete meal ready in the Instant Pot.

INSTANT POT SHRIMP PAELLA

 
Here is a tasty and delicious seafood dinner you can prepare in 5 minutes.

COCONUT SHRIMP CURRY



This coconut shrimp curry is perfect served over white rice. You'll love the spicy coconut sauce.

INSTANT POT RICE

 
Yes, you can also make rice in the Instant Pot! It takes just five minutes and comes out beautifully fluffy.

INSTANT POT CREME BRULEE

A decadent creme brulee is just minutes away!

INSTANT POT TAPIOCA PUDDING

 
An easy dessert flavored with coconut and vanilla.

40+ Chefs Speaking at Food on the Edge 2018

40+ CHEFS SPEAKING AT FOOD ON THE EDGE 2018 PHOTO ROBBIE REYNOLDS Food on the Edge sponsored by S.Pellegrino returns on 22 and 23 October...