Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Asia's Best Italian Restaurant Hits Bangkok


ASIA'S BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT HITS BANGKOK





This November, Bangkok will welcome chef Antimo Merone from the Macau outpost of chef Umberto Bombana's famed 8½ Otto e Mezzo Bombana restaurant for two dinners of extraordinary Italian cuisine, sponsored by S.Pellegrino and Acqua Panna.

Merome, who has a background in a number of Michelin star restaurants and has worked with chef Bombana since 2014, will be cooking a six course dinner with wines from the Allegrini Winery in Northern Italy on 3 November, and a set menu, with or without wine pairing the following night, 4 November. Both events will take place at Rossini's at the Sheraton Grande Sukhumvit, as part of the Fine Dining Lovers Guest Chef series.



Left to right: Hokkaido crab with Oscietra caviar; four-textured tiramisu

The original 8½ Otto e Mezzo Bombana in Hong Kong currently holds three Michelin stars of course – the first Italian restaurant to do so outside of Italy – and sits at number four on the Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants list.

The six course dinner will include dishes such as Hokkaido crab with Oscietra caviar, veal and Alba truffle-filled tortellini, and a four-textured tiramisu. Reservations should be made by calling 02 6498364 or emailing dining.sgs@luxurycollection.com.

Don't miss out!

When: 3 and 4 November

Where: Sheraton Grande Sukhumvit, Bangkok

Reservations: 02 6498364 / dining.sgs@luxurycollection.com

http://bit.ly/2z1C86l


ASIA'S 50 BEST RESTAURANTS 2017 - THE FULL LIST


1. GAGGAN - Bangkok, Thailand | Best Restaurant in Thailand by S.Pellegrino and Acqua Panna and Best Restaurant in Asia (read the FDL exclusive interview to Gaggan Anand)

2. RESTAURANT ANDRÉ - Singapore | Best Restaurant in Singapore by S.Pellegrino and Acqua Panna

3. AMBER - Hong Kong, China | Best Restaurant in China by S.Pellegrino and Acqua Panna

4. 8 1/2 OTTO E MEZZO BOMBANA - Hong Kong, China

5. NAHM - Bangkok, Thailand

6. NARISAWA - Tokyo, Japan | Best Restaurant in Japan sponsored by S.Pellegrino and Acqua Panna

7. NIHONRYORI RYUGIN - Tokyo, Japan

8. ULTRAVIOLET BY PAUL PAIRET - Shanghai, China

9. ODETTE - Singapore

10. BURNT ENDS - Singapore

11. DEN - Tokyo, Japan | The Art of Hospitality Award

12. L'EFFERVESCENCE - Tokyo, Japan

13. SUHRING – Bangkok, Thailand

14. FLORILEGE - Tokyo, Japan

15. MINGLES - Seoul, Korea | Best Restaurant in Korea

16. LES AMIS - Singapore

17. LUNG KING HEEN - Hong Kong, China

18. QUINTESSENCE - Tokyo, Japan

19. BO.LAN - Bangkok, Thailand

20. WAKU GHIN - Singapore

21. ISSAYA SIAMESE CLUB - Bangkok, Thailand

22. LOCAVORE - Bali, Indonesia | Highest Climber Award and Best Restaurant in Indonesia

23. CORNER HOUSE - Singapore

24. RAW - Taipei, Taiwan | Best Restaurant in Taiwan

25. JUNGSIK - Seoul, Korea

26. SUSHI SAITO - Tokyo, Japan

27. TIPPLING CLUB - Singapore

28. LE MOÛT - Taichung, Taiwan

29. MINISTRY OF CRAB - Colombo, Sri Lanka | Best Restaurant in Sri Lanka

30. INDIAN ACCENT - New Delhi, India | Best Restaurant in India sponsored by S.Pellegrino and Acqua Panna

31. EAT ME - Bangkok, Thailand

32. JADE DRAGON – Macau, China

33. TA VIE - Hong Kong, China

34. HAJIME - Osaka, Japan

35. GALLERY VASK - Manila, Philippines | Best Restaurant in the Philippines

36. THE DINING ROOM AT THE HOUSE OF SATHORN – Bangkok, Thailand

37. LE DU – Bangkok, Thailand

38. LA YEON - Seoul, South Korea

39. THE TASTING ROOM BY – Macau, China

40. L'ATELIER DE JOËL ROBUCHON - Bangkok, Thailand

41. L'ATELIER DE JOËL ROBUCHON - Hong Kong, China

42. JAAN* - Singapore

43. MUME – Taipei, Taiwan

44. SHINJI BY KANESAKA - Singapore

45. RONIN - Hong Kong, China

46. WASABI BY MORIMOTO - Mumbai, India

47. THE CHAIRMAN - Hong Kong, China

48. FU HE HUI - Shanghai, China

49. NIHONBASHI - Colombo, Sri Lanka

50. TAKAZAWA - Tokyo, Japan

14 No Bread Sandwich Recipes


14 NO BREAD SANDWICH RECIPES





Recipes for gluten-free bread are easy to come by, and not difficult to make. But what if the challenge consisted in making sandwiches without bread, that would be quite a different matter. What sort of burger would it be without bread to absorb all the meat juices and flavours?Can you imagine a toasted sandwich without sliced bread?

Anything is possible if you put your mind to it, even eliminating bread from sandwiches. Here are 14 alternative ideas for no bread sandwich, and not only for celiac sufferers, which are sure to widen your gourmet horizons quite unexpectedly.

CHICKEN BURGER WITHOUT BREAD



The usefulness of salad leaves in certain sandwiches filled with juicy meat and sauces becomes manifest in this particular version. The green leaf traps the flavours of the sandwich, prevents your hands from burning and offers a crisp and healthy note to everything. (Photo: domesticate-me)

HAMBURGER AND CHIPS



No hamburger would be complete without chips. So these pan-fried chips become delectable disks that enfold the meat in an embrace that is apparently platonic but full of mutual esteem. (Photo: coastalkitchen)

LITTLE COURGETTE AND TOMATO ROLLS



Just before dinner, but whenever you feel a bit peckish and the fridge seems to be empty, there is always one courgette hidden away in a corner, a piece of cheese or even half a tomato. The sandwich shape will gratify the mind more than the appetite, but happiness lies in little things. (Photo: easyappetizerideas)

PALEO HAMBURGER



Slices of sweet potato threaded onto a skewer to hold together a sizeable piece of meat, tomato, bacon and salad. With or without bread, it is difficult to resist getting your teeth into this corrupt meat lovers’ fantasy. (Foto: foodrepublic)

OMELETTE SANDWICH 



The sandwich filled with a Spanish or Italian omelette is perfect to take on a journey and equally easy to make without bread: instead of one large omelette make two smaller ones and fill them with any ingredient of your choice. A delight for the palate as well as being rich in all sorts of proteins. (Photo: stalkerville)

CHEESE SANDWICH



You just have to look at this photo to see that Fine Dining Lovers is teasing you. This is not a cheese sandwich but a cheese celebration. On top, inside and lovingly embraced to slices of sweet potato which form the supporting structure to the entire concoction. It would be kid’s play to replace the potato with Sardinian caciotta, but don’t tell anyone who you got the idea from. (Photo: bevcooks)

MINI CUCUMBER SANDWICHES



In just the same way as courgettes resist heroically in the refrigerator, cucumbers are also long-lived, maybe not intact, but with just enough to transform two or three slices into delightful sandwiches for filling with cheese or roast beef. Very British, very chic and very cheap. (Photo: wallpaperspublic)

EGG SANDWICHES



Sweet potato is in pole position to become the best stand-in for bread. Look at it here, posing as a bulky slice of loaf nonchalantly embracing a fried egg accompanied by a couple of lettuce leaves and sweet peppers. (Photo: willcrossfitforfood)

BURGER WITH MUSHROOMS



If you happen to run into some mushrooms big enough to hold a plump meat ball (we’re not really suggesting a burger), here’s what to do. The mushroom provides protection from the heat and gives a woody autumnal flavour – good for all seasons - to the valerian salad leaves and peppers. (Photo: laurenconrad)

SANDWICH WITH BREADED (AUBERGINE) CUTLET



A cutlet-filled sandwich is a must, but what if we turned it inside out to make the cutlet do the bread’s job? Would the world be ready for such a revolution? Of course it would. Even if the cutlet were in fact a slice of aubergine or any other ingredient breaded and fried. Try it. (Photo: eatfresh)

MIGNON AUBERGINE ROLLS



Not everyone likes pumpkin, so why not serve it in tiny morsels. Instead of bread, multifunctional aubergine can be used instead. Finely cut, it lends itself to becoming a vegetable version of mille feuille pastry and, if you close your eyes, you might even be fooled yourself. (Photo: dailygnome)

CHICKEN SANDWICH



An ingenious idea. A grilled chicken breast cut in two slices even looks like bread. Fill it with rocket leaves, mayonnaise, a slice of raw ham or delicious shrimps and your palate will be in seventh heaven. (Photo: diabeticonnect)

PASTRAMI TOASTED SANDWICH



For a sandwich with a Caribbean flavour, here’s presenting the plantain and pastrami toasted sandwich. Easy, delicious and extremely popular in a certain type of seedy venue overseas. Take the plantain, cut it in half lengthways, fry it in the pan and then let it cool. Place the two halves side by side and press them to obtain two fairly wide bread-like slices. Spread them with the meat and your favourite sauce. For those who prefer fish, there is a salmon pastrami version. (Photo: thenoshery)

TURKEY AND SALAMI ROLL



Who needs a piadina when you’ve got cold cuts? These too are designed to be rolled up together like the mythical flat bread from Romagna, Italy. In this case, we suggest turkey on the outside, then mortadella or cooked ham, salami, tender spring salad, flash fried tomatoes and peppers. Roll it all up and bite assertively. You’ll be impressed. (Source: primalbitesblog)

http://bit.ly/2z6iWGv

Scott Pickett: 'Kitchen is Where I Like to Be'

Scott Pickett: 'The Kitchen Is My Home'

SCOTT PICKETT: 'THE KITCHEN IS MY HOME'


The S.Pellegrino Young Chef 2018 mentor for Pacific region talks about how he will approach his role for the upcoming competition and his plans for the future.

Scott Pickett’s rise to chef stardom has been stratospheric. At 18 he won gold in Australia’s prestigious Salon Culinaire competition. He cut his teeth under Phillippe Mouchel at Paul Bocuse,and then had trials with Gordon Ramsay and Marco Pierre White in London, before settling at The Square under Phillip Howard. It was there he earned the nickname ‘The Digger’.

After representing Australia at the Bocuse d’Or, and working on a luxury yacht, he branched out on his own in Melbourne. At his Estelle Bistro, ESP and Saint Crispin restaurants, he has become renowned for his inventive use of native Australian ingredients. As he prepares to share his knowledge and experience as mentor for the Pacific region at S.Pellegrino Young Chef 2018, he spoke to Fine Dining Lovers about hard work, letting off steam, and Gordon Ramsay's sage advice.

Can you remember the moment you decided to become a chef – what inspired you and what obstacles did you overcome to achieve your dream?
From the moment I first stepped into a kitchen at 14 I found my home – my 'stainless steel asylum' as it was back in the ‘90s. I’ve never done anything else and probably never will. Its where I feel comfortable, its where I’ve grown up, its where I like to be.

What was your biggest triumph as a young chef, and is there anything you would consider your biggest failure?
My biggest triumph as a young chef was representing my country at the Bocuse d’Or. Competing taught me so many new and different skills, which I’m hoping to pass onto the S.Pellegrino young chef, John Riveria. My biggest failure would have to be not being as focused and committed when younger. I’ve always worked extremely hard, but I burnt the candle too. I probably didn't make the most of some opportunities because I was busy doing other things…



As a mentor, what do you expect from your young chef, and what do you think you can offer him?
I’d expect him to be focused, committed, dedicated, and to try his best whilst enjoying this amazing opportunity. I’d like to offer him support, guidance, a little bit of world knowledge and direction.

What would victory in the S.Pellegrino Young Chef competition mean for a young chef?
Winning the S.Pellegrino Young Chef competition would open up a lot of doors for the young chef, hopefully giving them opportunities to visit and work in some of the great restaurants around the world, and exposure to the best of the best in the culinary world.

Which is most important, natural talent or hard work?
Natural talent is a wonderful thing, but comes with a certain amount of responsibility. Nothing beats hard work. Talent isn’t just enough if you don't use it properly!

As a young chef you travelled to London and had a pretty intense time, including a close encounter with Gordon Ramsay – what can you tell us about that experience and what did it teach you?
I was fortunate enough to meet Gordon Ramsay a few times whilst I was working at The Square in Mayfair with Phil Howard, although I was only a young fella and I’m sure he doesn't remember! I actually did a stage at Royal Hospital Road in ‘99 and Gordon was lovely, very welcoming and accommodating for a young Aussie. At the end of service he sat down with me, gave me a beer and also some solid advice about the restaurant scene in London. What I should do with my time in the UK and a couple of home truths about taking the step up to work in Michelin star restaurants. It was inspirational and much needed.



Tell us why they call you ‘The Digger’.
It's a nickname I was given at The Square. Brett Graham was there also and we are obviously both Aussies, so when Rob Western got sick of two chefs answering to the call of ‘Skippy’ I was honoured with the name ‘The Digger.’ It became an alter ego for many years, but not so much anymore.

How do you let off steam these days?
As I get older, and the pressure of life, work, business and the industry start to increase, I have looked at other ways of minimising stress and dealing with the pressure by meditating and exercising more often. It's a wonderful way to put life and food into perspective.

Tell us about some of the native Australian ingredients you cook with and why it’s important for you to use them.
We use an assortment of native ingredients in the restaurants, mainly to showcase their flavour and to look at cooking what’s around us here in Australia. The food we cook has a sense of purpose and place, and is inextricably linked to our environment.

What are you working on at the moment, and what are your plans for the future?
I’m working on a wood-fuelled restaurant in South Yarra, opening early next year. I love projects and different cooking techniques, so it’s exciting to be learning new skills and developing new dishes.


http://bit.ly/2yZoy39

How to Eat Puntarella: The Roman Delicacy


HOW TO EAT PUNTARELLE: THE ROMAN DELICACY





Anyone who has tasted curly tendrils of bitter, crunchy puntarelle coated in a rich anchovy olive oil and garlic dressing will probably have already fallen in love with this delicious appetizer.

Come November, the hearts of enamoured fans beat a little faster as the seasonal delicacy swings back into season and lands back on the menu in many a restaurant in native Rome. But, they're also a welcome addition on many a menu further afield.

If you've ever tried preparing them at home, you'll know the fiddly prep work is well worth the effort. Or, if you happen to be in Rome, you'll even find them ready prepped.

Here's how to enjoy puntarelle at home, if you're lucky enough to get your hands on some this autumn.

WHAT ARE PUNTARELLE?

Puntarelle are the "fine tips" found hiding inside the spindly leaves of the Catalonian chicory.

HOW TO PREPARE PUNTARELLE?

Pull off all the outer leaves and detach each finger like hollow stalk.

Cut each stalk lengthwise and and then in half again. Keep cutting lengthwise until you have strips ¼ inch wide.

Put the puntarelle strips in a large bowl of iced water and soak for at least one hour, until they turn curly.

HOW TO EAT PUNTARELLE?

Simplicity is best. Punterelle can be eaten hot or cold but our favourite is the classic, served raw in a rich dressing of anchovies, olive oil, garlic and lemon juice or white wine vinegar. The robust dressing packs a punch and cuts through the bitterness of the puntarelle. The labour of love is well worth the reward.

Here's the recipe to enjoying puntarelle at their finest.



http://bit.ly/2yZRAzQ

Michelin Guide to New York 2018

MICHELIN GUIDE TO NEW YORK 2018





The Michelin Guide for New York has been announced with little changing at the top of the city's restaurant chain.

In the three star category the Jean Georges restaurant, which has held three Michelin stars since the New York Michelin guide was launched in 2006, dropped a star and now features in the guide's two star category.

In positive news, Sushi Ginza Onodera, by chef Masaki Saito, jumped from one star to two and there were six new one-star entries in the 2018 guide, three of them offering Japanese cuisine.

Below you can see the full list of restaurants in the Michelin Guide for New York 2018. You can also see all the other Michelin Guides for the States here.
MICHELIN GUIDE NEW YORK 2018

Three Stars

  • Chef’s Table at Brooklyn Fare 
  • Eleven Madison Park 
  • Le Bernardin
  • Masa
  • Per Se
Two Stars
  • Aquavit
  • Aska
  • Atera
  • Blanca
  • Daniel
  • Jean-Georges
  • Jungsik
  • Ko
  • The Modern
  • Ginza Onodera 
One Star
  • Agern
  • Ai Fiori
  • Aldea
  • Aureole
  • Babbo
  • Bar Uchu (new)
  • Batard
  • Blue Hill
  • The Breslin
  • Cafe Boulud
  • Carbone
  • Casa Enrique
  • Casa Mono
  • Caviar Russe
  • The Clocktower (new)
  • Contra
  • Cote (new)
  • Del Posto
  • Delaware and Hudson
  • Dovetail
  • Faro
  • The Finch
  • Gabriel Kreuther
  • Gotham Bar and Grill
  • Gramercy Tavern
  • Gunter Seeger
  • Hirohisa
  • Jewel Bako
  • Junoon
  • Kajitsu
  • Kanoyama
  • Kyo Ya
  • L’Appart
  • La Sirena
  • La Vara
  • Meadowsweet
  • Minetta Tavern
  • Musket Room
  • Nix
  • NoMad
  • Peter Luger
  • Rebelle
  • River Cafe
  • Rouge Tomate (new)
  • Satsuki (new)
  • Sushi Amane (new)
  • Sushi Inoue
  • Sushi Yasuda
  • Sushi Zo
  • Tempura Matsui
  • Tori Shin
  • Uncle Boons
  • Ushiwakamaru
  • Wallse
  • ZZ’s Clam Bar

http://bit.ly/2yYHpeT

15 Stunning Dishes from Paris's New Plating Star


15 STUNNING DISHES FROM PARIS'S NEW PLATING STAR





Atsushi Tanaka is a Japanese-born chef who plies his trade in Paris. He’s worked all over the world, including Pierre Gagnaire in Tokyo, Quique Dacosta in Spain and Geranium in Copenhagen, and though his cuisine may be hard to define, neither Japanese, Spanish nor French, and he is yet to win a Michelin star, his presentation style, minimalist and idiosyncratic, has led to the likes of Gagnaire describing him as the ‘Picasso of the Kitchen.’

Signature dishes at his Restaurant A.T in Paris's Latin Quarter include ‘Camouflage,’ which buries a fillet of arctic char under shards of solid parsley and juniper, and an all grey dessert of blueberry, hinoki, and coal.

This month Tanaka was awarded the ‘Best Food Art’ prize at the Best Chef Awards 2017 in Warsaw, an event that also ranked 300 of the world’s best chefs.

Here are 15 of his dishes for you to enjoy. Check out loads more over on the restaurant's Instagram page.

Monday, October 30, 2017

Restaurant Perfectly Shuts Down Reviewer


RESTAURANT PERFECTLY SHUTS DOWN REVIEWER


PHOTO SUGO PASTA KITCHEN


We love it when a restaurant bites back at a negative online review, especially when said review appears to be inaccurate, misleading, or just plain spiteful.

But of course, you’ve got be clever about it, stay calm and measured, and just dismantle the reviewer’s arguments one by one.

So we really enjoyed this response to a negative review on TripAdvisor from the team at Manchester’s Sugo Pasta Kitchen, which is rated ‘excellent’ by 399 out of 500 reviews.

Just to give you a bit of background, the reviewer in question claims to be a founder of a high street Italian restaurant chain in the UK that doesn’t exactly have a reputation for the finest Italian cuisine.

The reviewer, James, seems to like the Southern Italian food at Sugo, but complains about pretty much everything else: how he’s seated, how the staff are dressed, and the prices.

The staff are “scruffy” and “arrogant” according to James, the restaurant a con and the wine much too expensive, though he seems seem to have surprisingly little understanding of how restaurant mark-ups work, given his background. Oh and he didn’t leave a tip. Read the review below:



Restaurant owner Alex has the perfect response (below) though, fiercely defending the staff, the quality of the produce and the pricing. It’s a great example of how to deal with someone who’s willing to trash a small independent restaurant online, seemingly with little regard for the facts, something we see all too often.



The best response to a negative review ever? It’s certainly up there with this chef’s response to the so called ‘foodies’ who visited his restaurant and started their meal with a bowl of chips.
DON'T MISS: THIS GUY READS BAD RESTAURANT REVIEWS BACK TO CHEFS

http://bit.ly/2yYrAVz

Are Essential Oils Edible?


ARE ESSENTIAL OILS EDIBLE?





Olive, coconut, peanut, avocado, canola...your kitchen is mostly stocked with one or two of these oils. But what about cooking with essential oils? Because yes, these small bottles do not only purify your home or solve your skin or hair problems but can work wonders in the kitchen, provided they are edible and used sparingly.

EDIBLE ESSENTIAL OILS

Many essential oils are edible provided they meet a few criteria. To be sure choose organic brands, pure and natural essentials oils with very clear indications on the label. If the word "edible" is not indicated on the bottle, avoid using it in the kitchen or contact the brand directly to ask the question.

HOW TO USE EDIBLE ESSENTIAL OILS



You've probably noticed essential oils have a very powerful perfume. It is therefore important to use them sparingly at the risk of ruining a dish completely.

A tip: start by adding a single drop to your dish - add others only if necessary. Also, think of adding them only at the last moment to your recipe and off the heat in order to preserve all of their properties.

SOME EXAMPLES OF EDIBLE ESSENTIAL OILS

The most used edible essential oils are:

- Garlic essential oil: to flavor an aioli or other garlic-based dish
- Lemon essential oil: to enhance the taste of a sauce, to water a fish or to perfume a sherbet
- Bergamot essential oil: in a yogurt or on a fish
- Basil essential oil: on a pizza or a burrata
- Cinnamon essential oil: in gingerbread
- Coriander essential oil: to perfume Asian dishes
-Grapefruit essential oil: in baking cakes, cookies or making icing
-Peppermint essential oil: in cocktails, desserts and chocolate dishes
-Mustard essential oil: used in Italian preserves known as ''mostarda'' (recipe below)

RECIPES WITH EDIBLE ESSENTIAL OILS

MOSTARDA DI CREMONA




The essential oil of mustard is a key ingredient in mostarda, a specialty fruit preserve produced in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna (also home to Parmesan cheese).

Mostarda is pungent, intensely flavorful and adds a decadent touch to any appetizer plate. It is excellent enjoyed with cheese, crackers, bread and wine.

Try this delightful recipe for mostarda.

LEMON BARS



Adding just one drop of lemon essential oil to this recipe for lemon bars will yield beautiful results - an aromatic dessert that will brighten up your day.

CHAI LATTE CINNAMON CUPCAKES




Take these chai latte cupcakes to the next level by incorporating just one drop of cinnamon essential oil.

PUMPKIN PIE



Don't have any pumpkin pie spice on hand? Don't sweat it! You can flavor this pumpkin pie recipe by using 2 drops each of clove, ginger and cinnamon essential oils.

ROSEMARY MASHED POTATOES



Next time you whip up a batch of mashed potatoes add 2 drops of rosemary essential oil to add a flavorful twist to this comforting dish.

http://bit.ly/2z302QP

Affordable Luxury: Where to Eat in Marrakesh

Affordable Luxury: Where to Eat in Marrakesh

AFFORDABLE LUXURY: WHERE TO EAT IN MARRAKESH


Up to 25, 50 or 100 euros: in Marrakesh there are gourmet experiences to be enjoyed by all. Find out how to make the most of a limited budget.

Night falls over Marrakech, Morocco, heightening the city's allure as the landscape lights up. Known as the 'Pink City' because of the colour of the desert earth that the houses are made from, Marrakech has two souls; the old town, called Medina, and the new, modern town. Here are some recommendations for places to ensure you experience the more luxurious side of Marrakech, with some ideas for experiences you can enjoy while spending up to 25, 50 or 100 euros.

WHERE TO EAT IN MARRAKESH FROM 0 TO 25 EUROS


Opened in 1999, Comptoir Darna is one of the city's oldest restaurants and is set in the Hivernage, a renowned quarter in Marrakech which, although a little touristy, is definitely a must-see. To the backdrop of oriental chic décor, dancers and musicians, enjoy a drink and sample local dishes (25 euros).



The Maison Arabe Hotel exudes a captivating, old-world ambiance that makes you feel part of the history of the hotel, which was one of the very first riads to accommodate Europeans in Marrakech. It is only a 15-minute walk from places of interest including the Dar El Bacha Palace, Jamaa el Fna and theKoutoubia Minaret. The restaurant serves traditional Moroccan cuisine, without departing from the classics (15 euros per course). It also runs a half-day cooking course, one of the first in Morocco. There is also an organic vegetable garden where pupils gather herbs and vegetables to cook with. Learn how to make cous cous and meat, fish and vegetarian tajines (50 euros).

WHERE TO EAT IN MARRAKESH FROM 25 TO 50 EUROS

The Inara restaurant is located inside the Four Seasons Hotel, which is nestled in an oasis overlooked by the Atlas Mountains. Inara specialises in Moroccan dishes paired with local and North African wines. Choose the exquisite chicken breast tajine with lemon and olives (20 euros) or the seven-bean lamb cous cous. You can also sip on a good glass of Moroccan white wine from the Meknès region.



Gastro MK is an elegant restaurant set within the Hotel Maison MK. Cutting-edge yet affordable, the restaurant combines Moroccan and French cuisine. For an unforgettable dining experience, ask for a table on the scenic terrace overlooking the city. This restaurant offers the 'gastro-experience', which consists of a succession of dishes, including a choice of deconstructed tajines, such as fillet of beef, caramelised shallot purée, shallot tarte tatin and wilted courgette/ herbed mash (set menu approximately 50 euros).

Marrakchi is a brasserie-style restaurant with French influences and is lesser known with tourists. Try one of their versions of tangia, a typical dish that combines different types of meat such as lamb or beef. The chicken with honey and almonds is delicious, or try one of the mechouia salads, which combine tomatoes, bell peppers and grilled aubergine, all dressed with salt, pepper, garlic, coriander powder and olive oil (10 euros per dish). Finish off with a mint tea.

WHERE TO EAT IN MARARKESH FROM 50 TO 100 EUROS

The Mandarin Oriental, Marrakech is a truly spectacular, exclusive location, set in 20 hectares of sprawling parkland. The hotel offers a range of restaurant and bar options to choose from. But the most coveted address has to be Ling Ling, a Cantonese-style restaurant with a bar serving signature cocktails, which play a more complex role than just drinks to pair with food, but rather constitute the heart of the experience. The chef at the Ling Ling is Ho Chee Boon, who is also the executive chef for the legendary restaurant Hakkasan. He divides his time between Marrakech, Las Vegas and San Francisco.



The menu features an array of different appetisers for sharing; on this budget, you could easily try at least 7 or 8 of these tantalising appetisers, such as the golden fried chicken and mango salad in sweet chilli or spicy prawn with lily bulb and almond. If you want to play it safe, just order the Ling Ling experience (approximately 60 euros, excluding drinks). Bear in mind that each super cocktail, like the Ling Ling Collins (Beefeater 24 gin, Green Chatreuse liqueur, shiso leaf, cranberry juice, grapefruit juice, elderflower syrup and soda water) will cost you upwards of around 15 euros.


http://bit.ly/2yZ2BRV

Latin America's 50 Best Restaurants 2017 Top 10 in 10 Dishes

Latin America's 50 Best Restaurants 2017 Top 10 in 10 Dishes


LATIN AMERICA'S 50 BEST RESTAURANTS 2017 TOP 10 IN 10 DISHES


Enjoy a dish from every restaurant in the top 10 of Latin America's 50 Best Restaurants 2017, with Mitsuharu Tsumura's Maido restaurant in Lima #1.

A few days ago the Latin America's 50 Best Restaurants ceremony, an event sponsored byS.Pellegrino and Acqua Panna, crowned Maido restaurant in Lima as the best restaurant in Latin America for 2017.

The 2017 edition was held in Bogotá, and we have decided to take a look at inspirational dishes made by the top 10 chefs, with a selection of wonderful food pictures.

From Mitsuharu Tsumura's Maido restaurant to Mishiguene in Argentina, enjoy this year's top 10 restaurants through the food lens of the chef's signature dishes.

And if you're curious about the 2017 edition, have a look at the full list of Latin America's 50 Best Restaurants for this year.


Below you can see the Latin America’s 50 Best Restaurants list in full:

1 - Maido, Peru – Best Restaurant in Peru

2 - Central, Peru

3 - D.O.M., Brazil – Best Restaurant in Brazil

4 - Pujol, Mexico - Best Restaurant in Mexico

5 - Boragó, Chile – Best Restaurant in Chile

6 - Quintonil, Mexico

7 - Astrid Y Gastón, Peru – Art of Hospitality Award

8 - A Casa do Porco, Brazil

9 - Mani, Brazil

10 - Tegui, Argentina – Best Restaurant in Argentina

11 - Sud777, Mexico

12 - Osso, Peru

13 - Don Julio, Argentina

14 - 99, Chile

15 - La Mar, Peru

16 - Lasai, Brazil

17 - Harry Sasson, Colombia – Highest Climber, Best Restaurant in Colombia

18 - Leo, Colombia

19 - El Baqueano, Argentina

20 - Maito, Panama – Best Restaurant in Panama

21 - Isolina, Peru

22 - Parador La Huelia, Uruguay – Best Restaurant in Uruguay

23 - Olympe - Brazil

24 - Rafael, Peru

25 - Pangea, Mexico

26 - Chila, Argentina

27 - Mocoto, Brazil

28 - Gustu, Bolivia – Best Restaurant in Bolivia

29 - Nico's, Mexico

30 - Malabar, Peru

31 - Biko, Mexico

32 - Amaranta, Mexico

33 - Ambrosia, Chile

34 - Corazon de Tierra, Mexico

35 - Rosetta, Mexico

36 - Alcalde, Mexico – Highest New Entry

37 - Elena, Argentina

38 - Restaurante 040, Chile

39 - Maximo Bistrot, Mexico

40 - Villanos en Bermuda, Colombia

41 - Esquina Mocoto, Brazil

42 - Laja, Mexico

43 - La Docena Oyster Bar & Grill, Mexico

44 - Aramburu, Argentina

45 - Tuju, Brazil

46 - Fiesta, Peru

47 - Amaz, Peru

48 - Crizia, Argentina

49 - Proper, Argentina

50 -Mishiguene, Argentina

Salmon cutlet with Orange vinaigrette and watercress


SALMON CUTLET WITH ORANGE VINAIGRETTE AND WATERCRESS




If you're looking for new salmon recipes, don't miss this delicious Salmon cutlet with Orange vinaigrette and watercress.

INGREDIENTS


For the vinaigrette


INFO BOX

  • Preparation time - 1 h 15 m
  • Cooking time - 20 m
  • Recipe category - Main course
  • Recipe yield - 4
PREPARATION


MAKE THE VINAIGRETTE

Squeeze the oranges and one lime and mix the dill, ginger and grated orange rind with the juice.

Season with salt and pepper.

PREPARE THE SALMON

Pour 2/3 of the vinaigrette over the salmon steaks and put into a roasting bag.

Seal and marinate in the refrigerator for about 1 hour.

Then put the roasting bag into a preheated oven (180°C) and cook the salmon steaks in their own juice for about 20 minutes.

PREPARE THE SALAD

Wash and sort the corn salad and watercress and spin dry.

Mix the remaining vinaigrette with the olive oil and season to taste.

Cover each plate with salad and drizzle with the dressing.

Wash the limes and cut into wedges.

Take the salmon steaks out of the oven, place on the salad and serve immediately.

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Halloween Homemade Treats That Are Hauntingly Delicious

Halloween Homemade Treats That Are Hauntingly Delicious


HALLOWEEN HOMEMADE TREATS THAT ARE HAUNTINGLY DELICIOUS


From the classic red licorice and strawberry gummies to glow-in-the-dark jelly and lychee-infused green mousse - we've got the spooky treats you want to eat.

Homemade Halloween treats aren't just for kids! Adults can enjoy the pleasure of biting into a sweet tempting dessert that is made with the finest ingredients.

Here we gather some of our favorite homemade Halloween treats both kids and adults will love. From the classic red licorice and strawberry gummies infused with elderflower to glow-in-the-dark jelly and lychee-infused green mousse - learn how to create timeless desserts that will haunt you (in a good way) long after Halloween is over.

Let's get cooking and if you are looking for more delightful Halloween ideas don't miss our complete guide to all things spooky.


RED LICORICE

CREEPY JELLY

MARSHMALLOWS



PUMPKIN TART



PUMPKIN COOKIES

GLOW IN THE DARK JELLY



STRAWBERRY GUMMIES

MOUSSE CAKE




PUMPKIN CUPCAKES




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Red Jalapeños vs. Green Jalapeños: What's The Difference?

Are red jalapeño peppers any different than green jalapeños? Does the color alter the taste? Fine Dining Lovers tackles this hot topic. Get ...