Thursday, August 31, 2017

What is Biodynamic Wine and Viticulture?


WHAT IS BIODYNAMIC WINE AND VITICULTURE?


Are you thirsty for some biodynamic wine? Discover the basics of biodynamic viticulture, a form of holistic winemaking practice respecting biodiversity.


Some consider biodynamic viticulture as this super organic mumbo-jumbo type of farming, others think it’s pure marketing, maybe it’s a religion, or perhaps just an excuse to put a bigger price tag on the bottle. Not much can be said about biodynamic wines that has not been said already. Some love the concept, others just love to hate it.

The biodynamic wine movement has suffered its fair share of prejudice in the past. Now that some of the best wines on the planet are made by using biodynamic practices, the general attitude is shifting. Still, the matter continuously raises some questions. I do not claim to fully understand it. For the longest time, I didn’t want to bother my fuzzy little head with it.

The Biodynamic Association describes it as “a holistic, ecological, and ethical approach to farming, gardening, food, and nutrition.” Biodynamic practices have been around since 1920’s when the Austrian philosopher Dr. Rudolf Steiner gave his “two cents” about agriculture to a bunch of farmers. The farmers took his insights and bada-bing, nearly a century later we're drinking biodynamic wine.


SO, WHAT IS BIODYNAMICS?

In biodynamics, the farm is basically a self-sustaining organism where chemical fertilizers and pesticides are not used. A healthy and diverse ecosystem means good vibes for the vines. Biodynamic farmers use homeopatic sprays and preparations made from fermented manure, herbs and such to harmonize and vitalize the vineyard. Calendars are used to follow moon cycles and planets. There are fruit, root, leaf and flower days, and each of these days indicates if it’s a good day for harvesting, pruning and various other tasks. For example, wine should taste better if you drink it on fruit days. In addition to the agricultural side of biodynamics, there is also a social and economic sustainability twist to the whole thing.

I met up with an Italian wine producer to see if he could teach me, like the little man-child I am, what is biodynamics all about. “I would describe biodynamics as this will, a desire, to go back to a closed organism and recreate biodiversity,” says Clemens Lageder, a wine producer in Alto Adige, in northern Italy.

“We did some experiments in 90’s but it didn’t work. We didn’t have the courage to convert. In 2004 we started when my father decided that we needed to take that step to convert all our vineyards to biodynamic,” he continues. “My grandmother was raised with biodynamics but it’s different to manage your garden biodynamically than 50 hectares of vineyards. When my father joined the company in the 70’s, he always had a dream that one day he would convert to biodynamic.”



PREJUDICES ABOUT BIODYNAMICS

People are quick to judge biodynamics, as Mr. Lageder adds “many people think that if you convert your vines to biodynamic you lose crops, the vine will be unhealthy and suffer from diseases. To be honest, it’s not about the plant. It’s about the people who are working in the vineyards. When we started with biodynamics the hardest thing was to motivate our employees. You go and tell them 'everything you have learned from your father, in schools and here in the past 20 years, just forget it'. We tell them no more pesticides, we use compost. We tell them about the manure stuffed cow horns that we put underground, then take them out and spray it in homeopatic doses in the vineyards. We come together at 5 am and dynamize the preparation. Of course, everybody will think you are a complete fool. That was the most difficult thing, to motivate our employees to take this step with us. There were many that decided to leave.”

I probably would have left too. If you focus just on the moon, planets and preparations, it sounds a bit out-there.
RECREATING BIODIVERSITY

“The basement of biodynamics is to go back to a closed organism”, Mr. Lageder continues. “Rudolf Steiner was talking about a closed organism at a time when agriculture was getting industrialized. What happened with that? We lost diversity in the last hundred years. The goal of biodynamics was always to recreate biodiversity. When we talk about viticulture, we see it as something different than the whole rest of agriculture. That’s a big problem because viticulture is a part of agriculture and you should never look at one culture, you should always try to create a certain diversity. For me, this is the main objective of biodynamic agriculture.”

Grasping the whole the idea of biodynamics proves challenging. I wouldn’t exactly say that I’m a groupie but it’s hard to argue when you taste some of these wines. I’m not saying all biodynamic wines are great, not at all, but I find myself expecting more from the wine if it’s biodynamic. They say “great wines are made in the vineyards”. In that case, going above and beyond for those precious little grapes should be priority number one.


http://bit.ly/2vLVZmK

6 Risotto Recipes With A Chef's Touch

6 RISOTTO RECIPES WITH A CHEF'S TOUCH





You don't have to be Italian to make great risotto. You don't even have to be a chef, for that matter. But you do need one thing: a good risotto recipe.

These six stellar risotto recipes are from world-renown chefs and are just the thing to make when you want to impress your dinner guests.

Take your pick from a seafood inspired squid risotto from the chef of the sea, Angel Leon, or showcase salicornia in an unusual risotto from Inaki Aizpitarte. Keep it classic and bold with Marchesi's iconic saffron risotto from the home of risotto, or try your hand at a more daring mushroom risotto with sweetbreads. There's an unusual twist to appeal to all budding chefs.

For the uninitiated, risotto making comes with a few important rules. Check in with our 5 chef rules for making risotto before starting out.

SQUID RISOTTO WITH PLANKTON BY ANGEL LEON



Chef Ángel León's recipe enriches a classic risotto with both squid and marine plankton, giving extra flavour and texture. Find out more about marine plankton here.
BLACK SESAME AND APPLE RISOTTO BY CHEF CARLO CRACCO



Renowned celebrity Italian chef, restaurateur and Marchesi taught Carlo Cracco shares an unusal recipe for risotto with black sesame and apple.
SAFFRON RISOTTO WITH EDIBLE GOLD LEAVES BY CHEF GUALTIERO MARCHESI



Try the world famous Italian chef Gualtiero Marchesi's signature dish for a traditional Milanese saffron risotto made adding a precious golden leaf at the end. Here are 9 more dishes from the Italian master.
MUSHROOM RISOTTO WITH SWEETBREADS AND GRANA PADANO CHEESE BY CHEF CLAUDIO SADLER



If you are a funghi fan, try elevating your standard mushroom risotto with this recipe that includes sweetbreads and Grana Padano, from the Italian chef Claudio Sadler from Sadler restaurant in Milan.
SALICORNIA RISOTTO BY CHEF INAKI AIZPITARTE



Chef Inaki Aizpitarte shows us how to cook salicornia like an Italian risotto with a easy and healthy recipe, ready in half an hour. Find out more about the delights of salicornia here.
RISOTTO WITH SCAMPI, LICORICE AND BEEF TENDONS BY CHEFS ITALO BASSI AND RICCARDO MONCO



This wonderfully light and elegant scampi rice recipe for a delicious seafood risotto was presented by chefs Italo Bassi and Riccardo Monco.


http://bit.ly/2vsikKX

Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Filipino Recipe: How to Cook Tinolang Manok (Chicken Soup)


FILIPINO RECIPE: HOW TO COOK TINOLANG MANOK (CHICKEN SOUP)



TINOLANG MANOK: FILIPINO CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE SOUL

If you love comfort food and exotic flavors you may want to give tinolang manok a try.

This Filipino dish is also known as chicken tinola and consists of chicken cooked in a ginger broth. The secret ingredient is green papaya, which not only adds color but contributes healing elements to the soup (the fruit enzymes promote good digestion).

Tinolang manok is a simple yet flavorful recipe perfect for those times when nothing but a hearty bowl of soup will do. Let's take a look at how to make it:
HOW TO COOK TINOLANG MANOK

Naturally, every home cook has his or her own version of tinolang manok but there is a consensus about the essentials that make up the broth: onion, garlic and ginger. These aromatics are sautéed in oil then the chicken (called manok in Filipino) is added to the pot.

The chicken, which is a whole bird cut into pieces, is cooked until lightly browned. Then fish sauce is added to the pot, along with enough water to cover the chicken. This is all brought to a boil then simmered until the chicken is tender, about 35 to 40 minutes.

Once the chicken is cooked through then you can have a bit of fun with add ins. Some cooks add chayote squash in place of green papaya. Greens, such as spinach or watercress are a great addition, as are chili leaves or green chilies.



Here is a wonderful tinolang manok recipe from Reggie at KauKauTime.

Tip: If you want to add greens to the pot do so in the last 2 to 3 minutes of cooking time so they retain their beautiful bright green color.
RECIPE VIDEO FOR HOW TO COOK TINOLANG MANOK

Need to see the recipe in action? Watch How To Cook Great show you how to cook tinolang manokwith green papaya and moringa leaves.


http://bit.ly/2vrf7uO

Anthony Genovese: I Always Focus on Creating Emotions

Anthony Genovese: I Always Focus on Creating Emotions

ANTHONY GENOVESE: I ALWAYS FOCUS ON CREATING EMOTIONS


A chat with the S.Pellegrino Young Chef 2018 mentor for Italy, about his cuisine and the new gourmet experience offered by his restaurant 'Il Pagliaccio'.

BY ROBERTA ABATE ON AUGUST 30, 2017


As judge and mentor of S.Pellegrino Young Chef 2018, Anthony Genovese, with two Michelin stars to his name for the restaurant Il Pagliaccio in Rome, is faced with an arduous task: that of selecting, together with five colleagues, the future finalist of the S.Pellegrino international competition and accompanying him or her through the preparatory phases towards the Grand Final.

Anthony Genovese is an Italian-French chef who, after many years spent in the South of France, has found his home and success in Rome. The staff of Il Pagliaccio have just reopened the restaurant after a refurbishment: what can we expect after this interval? "An even greater surge of passion and energy" as well as a new menu.

Can you remember the exact moment in which you decided to become a chef? What inspired it and what hurdles did you get over to make that dream come true?
I have always wanted to be a chef; my career is punctuated with travels, experiences and obstacles, but it is also driven by ambition and an impassioned commitment. This is a job that requires great sacrifice and, I don't believe I am very different from many other colleagues whose work I admire. It is not easy to work around the world owing to a number of obstacles (different languages, traditions and cultures) but what counts most is the opportunity to widen our cultural horizons, which is even more important than our culinary experience. So, the hurdles I have had to address have led me to where I am today: in a position to manage the ownership (and not only the kitchen) of a two-starred restaurant in the centre of Rome.



What was your greatest achievement as a young chef, and what do you judge to be your greatest failure?
The Michelin Star I was awarded at Palazzo Sasso. My biggest failure was certainly that of seeing my new restaurant in Rome close down just a few months from its debut. But I think I have amply made up for it...

As a mentor, what do you expect from a young chef and what do you think you can offer him or her?
I can offer my experience and my passion for this profession, with sincerity and frankness. I expect him or her to treasure my advice, without letting my personality get in the way of their own creativity. It has to be a personal experience and a voyage of discovery. I can only accompany him but not decide the route.

What would it mean for a young chef to win the S.Pellegrino Young Chef award?
A new beginning without a doubt. A great accolade and a feather in the cap for Italian cuisine worldwide. But it will also be a moment of great media exposure which needs to be managed as well as possible, without losing touch with reality, for a start.

Do you enjoy the role of mentor that has been assigned to you?
This is the first time I have “officially” been in this position and I feel both flattered and honoured. However, in recent years at the Pagliaccio, I have fallen naturally into this role, possibly owing to my increased experience, helping many young chefs to grow professionally, I am proud to say, who now run their own kitchens in Rome and elsewhere.



What is your culinary philosophy?
A respect for ingredients is always my first priority. It is essential. Then, I like to make a clear distinction between the various ingredients, while creating a possibility for them to come together with their different flavours. I always focus on creating emotions. We have given a name to this concept of mine. It is called “Parallels”, a trail that leads each diner to enjoy a personal culinary experience, not only influenced by my way of conceiving a dish, but also by the positive impact of the Pagliaccio dining room and the personal background of each guest. Parallels is the new gourmet experience offered by Il Pagliaccio: a surprise that changes and evolves in time, without ever being fully explicated in the menu. This calls for the curiosity of a traveller.

In your opinion, what is the most outstanding feature of Italian cuisine?
What most distinguishes Italian cuisine is that there is no one particular Italian cuisine. It is a multifaceted affair based on different regional traditions rather than one single tradition. This variety translates into culture.

What do you find to be the most exciting aspect of contemporary cuisine?
I love to see how contemporary cuisine is attempting to combine experimentation with the centrality of the main ingredient.

What is the future of Italian cuisine?
The way I see it, the future lies in the synthesis of those elements often believed to be far removed or diametrically opposed: respect and tradition, innovation and modernity. I believe such a synthesis is possible.

Tell us about your work: you have just reopened your restaurant after a few months' closure; what's new and what can we expect to find?
You can expect an even greater surge of passion and energy. After all, for restaurant owners like us, used to an everyday adrenaline charge, a period of forced rest can only translate into an overwhelming desire to experience these emotions once more. Obviously, you can also expect to find the new “Parallels” menu: new sensations and new parallel experiences in the way of flavour. Finally, you can expect to find my own identity coming over loud and clear. That will always be on the menu.

http://bit.ly/2vqPdaK

10 Dishes from Clare Smyth's First Solo Restaurant


10 DISHES FROM CLARE SMYTH'S FIRST SOLO RESTAURANT





Much excitement greeted the opening of Clare Smyth’s first solo restaurant in London earlier this month. The Northern Irish chef had for close to a decade maintained Restaurant Gordon Ramsay’sthree Michelin star status – the only female chef in the UK to hold three stars – so the food world was hot with anticipation after she announced plans to embark on her own venture on leaving in 2015.

The food at Core, in London’s Notting Hill, relies on sustainable organic produce from UK farmers and suppliers – Smyth grew up on a farm in County Antrim – across a three or five course menu, or a longer tasting menu. There’s also an extensive wine list stretching to 400-plus bottles.

We’ve pulled some nice official pics together below, as well as a few from Instagram, so you can see just what one of London’s most anticipated new openings has to offer. Dishes include Charlotte Potato with Trout and Herring Roe, Lamb-Braised Carrot and Passion Fruit and Red Kambot.

Restaurant Pays Employees to Spot Food Critics


RESTAURANT PAYS EMPLOYEES TO SPOT FOOD CRITICS




We’ve all heard anecdotes about kitchens that keep photos of food critics on the wall so they can spot them when they walk in, but one restaurant is allegedly going a step further – by offering staff cash rewards if they spot a food critic.

According to a report in the Washington City Paper, Fiola Mare in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. offers staff a $500 reward if they spot a reviewer in the dining room, that is according to one former and one current employee who wish to remain anonymous.

The restaurant is owned by the Fabio Trabocchi Restaurants group, and chef Fabio Trabocchi hasn’t thus far denied the claims, telling the Paper: “Recognition of all types of guests is a defining characteristic of our service program … from food critics, to members of Congress, to our investors, to VIP Club members, to first time diners.”

With the ability of critics to make or break a restaurant, some would say $500 is a small price to kick a business up a level.

http://bit.ly/2vHyL0X

6 Floral Cocktail Recipes


6 FLORAL COCKTAIL RECIPES





Looking to add another dimension to your mixology skills come cocktail time?

Why not try adding in a floral element to capture a special moment, the seasons or simply add a bohemian touch to your evening.

Whether you choose a floral liqueur, essence, or syrup to cocktails for added depth and complexity with a garnish of fresh flowers, you're sure to enchant your guests.

From colourul violet infused aviation to hibiscus crowned cocktails kicking up your cocktails with a floral touch adds a captivating element and a touch of sophistication. Find the pick of floral coctail recipes below.

If you like this, take a look at 6 recipes for herb cocktails.

1. AVIATION COCKTAIL RECIPE



Try this simple recipe for an aviation cocktail with a purple hue courtesy of kitchen Swagger. Creme de violette adds the floral touch, along with a gin kick plus lemon juice and maraschino liqueur.

2. FROZEN HIBISCUS MARGARITAS



Dried hibiscus flowers add an exotic edge to this deliciously refreshing margarita recipe from prettygirlscook.

3. SUMMER'S GARDEN



Rose geranium syrup is the secret ingredient in this recipe from neighbourhood kitchen.

4. LAVENDER COCKTAIL



Lavender honey syrup balances out this simple to make cocktail from Honestlyum.

5. BORAGE AND PANSY COCKTAIL



This stunning looking gin based cocktail from Anthropologie includes borage syrup and creme de violet echoed by the fresh borage and pansies on top.

If you like this look, here are more tips on how to use edible flowers.


http://bit.ly/2vHeMQ7

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

S.Pellegrino Young Chef 2018: All the Local Juries and Mentors

S.PELLEGRINO YOUNG CHEF 2018: ALL THE LOCAL JURIES AND MENTORS





With S.Pellegrino Young Chef 2018 well underway, 210 regional semi-finalists have already been selected, the local juries are complete and the local competitions are underway (find out the latest news here).

Each of the 21 regions competing has been allocated a local jury (one for every world region) of world class professional chefs. The team of culinary heavyweights will select the most talented young chef in the region with the capacity to represent the area on the world stage at the Grand Finale of S.Pellegrino Young Chef 2018 in Milan.

A chef from each local jury has already been or will be selected as the area mentor, and will provide the local finalist with tutelage and support up until and including the Grand Finale.

See the full list of chefs forming the local jury for each of the 21 regions below.

(Please note that in some regions the mentor will be announced following the local competition to ensure geographical proximity to the winner's country.)
LOCAL JURY MEMBERS BY REGION
FRANCE

Frédéric Anton - Mentor (you can meet him here)
Philippe Mille
Christophe Bacquié

Click here to find out more about the French Jury
ITALY

Anthony Genovese - Mentor
Cristina Bowerman
Caterina Ceraudo
Loretta Fanella
Carlo Cracco
Ciccio Sultano

Click here to find out more about the jury for Italy
JAPAN

Luca Fantin - Mentor (you can meet him in our interview here)
Yoshiaki Takazawa
Thomas Angerer
Zaiyu Hasegawa

Click here to find out more about the jury for Japan
UK- IRELAND

Angela Hartnett - Mentor
Alyn Williams
Phil Howard
Mickael Viljanen

Find out more about the Uk and Ireland jury here
GERMANY AND AUSTRIA

Karlheinz Hauser - Mentor (meet him in our interview here)
Karl Obauer
Nico Burkhardt
Robert Maas
Sarah Henke

Click here to find out more about the jury for Germany & Austria
BENELUX

Ron Blaauw
Jaimie van Heije
David Martin
Peter Goossens
René Matthieu

Click here to find out more about the jury for Benelux
CHINA

Jacqueline Qiu - Mentor (you can meet her here in our interview here)
Riccardo La Perna
Zhou Xiaoyan
Stefan Stiller
Otto Wong

Click here to find out more about the jury for China
SPAIN AND PORTUGAL

Oriol Castro - Mentor
Josean Alija
Paco Roncero
Henrique Sa Pessoa

Click here to find out more about the jury for Spain & Portugal
AFRICA AND MIDDLE EAST

Sascha Triemer
Marthinus Ferreira
Dominique Grel

Click here to find out more about the jury for Africa & Middle East
SOUTH-EAST ASIA

Chele Gosalez
Richard Ekkebus
Vicky Lau
Mingoo Kang
Tetsuya Wakuda

Click here to find out more about the jury for South-East Asia
NORTH-EAST ASIA

André Chiang
Gaggan Anand
Jason Tan
Margarita Forés
Ray Adriansyah

Find out more about the north-east Asia jury here.
MEDITERRANEAN COUNTRIES

Nikos Roussos - Mentor (Meet him in our interview here)
Ismet Saz
Haim Cohen

Find out more about the jury for the Mediterranean Countries here
SWITZERLAND

André Jaeger - Mentor
Martin Dalsass
Robert Speth
Patrick Zbinden
Markus Linder
SOUTH AMERICA

Rafel Osterling
Harry Sasson
Rodolfo de Santis

Meet the South America Local Jury here
RUSSIA-CIS

Emmanuelle Pollini
Andrey Shmakov
Dmitriy Blinov
Anatoliy Kazakov
Dmitriy Zotov
Adrian Quetglas
Regis Triguel
Vladimir Mukhin
SCANDINAVIA AND BALTICS

Per Hallundbæk - Mentor
Tom Sjöstedt
James Maxwell-Stewart
Henri Alen
Jānis Zvirbulis
Egidijus Lapinskas
Andrus Laaniste

Meet the Scandinavia and Baltic local jury here.
CENTRAL AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

Saverio Stassi
Mario Castrellon
Martha Ortiz
Edgar Nuñez
Mikel Alonso
CANADA

Anthony Walsh
Joël Watanabe
Todd Perrin
Riccardo Bertolino
Jen Agg
PACIFIC

Jacques Reymond
Andrew McConnell
Scott Pickett
Christine Manfield

Meet the Pacific Region Local Jury
EAST EUROPE

Wojciech Modest Amaro
Ana Ros
Florin Scripca
Andre Tokiev
Andras Wolf
USA

Gavin Kaysen - Mentor
April Bloomfield
Dave Beran
Daniela Soto-Innes
Mitch Lienhard

Don't miss any of the S.Pellegrino Young Chef 2018 news, updates and interviews!
tags


http://bit.ly/2vFLYYf

7 Alternative Caviars to Discover


7 ALTERNATIVE CAVIARS TO DISCOVER

From the 'faux caviar', to the snail and the lumpfish qualities, here is a list of delicious (and more or less expensive) caviar substitutes to know.

Considered to be a “luxury product”, caviar owes its exclusive reputation to the fact that it is difficult to obtain sturgeon roe. And yet, there are plenty of alternatives to classical caviar. These often consist of quite different foods which offer us an opportunity to familiarize with new flavours and use some interesting new ingredients in our recipes.

After all, no matter how exclusive, nothing could be more obvious than serving beluga roe on toast, but who would ever expect to taste snail caviar? Here is a list of caviar substitutes to impress your guests.



COUSCOUS "FAUX CAVIAR"

A very affordable alternative to caviar, original and tasty, often to be seen on finger food menus. It is known as “faux caviar”. It is obtained by preparing couscous in a way that it still has plenty of bite to it, before being flavoured with a generous amount of butter and, as a second step, with sepia ink. If sufficient care is taken when adding the latter ingredient and mixing with a fork, the result looks like shiny black pearls (they can be made to look even shinier with the addition of some olive oil before serving).
SOY PEARLS

So-called "soy pearls" are based on the same principle. These are tiny select soy spheres which are boiled and generally sold in jars preserved in oil, or aromatized with spices, yuzu or wasabi. Of course their flavour is a far cry from that of authentic caviar and rather tasteless besides, but the "pearls" lend themselves perfectly to being used as edible garnishes.
SNAIL CAVIAR

This is in fact one of the most bizarre examples of “alternative caviar”. Completely different from sturgeon, its flavour is earthy and reminiscent of mushrooms; it is obtained by allowing snails to mate in highly controlled environments and the resulting eggs are subjected to a meticulous selection. So much so that, at the end of the day, their cost is practically on a par with that of traditional caviar: here we are talking roughly about 1800 Euros per kilo. However, there are some varieties that are sold in little 50 gram jars (about a couple of spoonfuls) at 100-120 Euros (2000-2400 Euros per kilo). Besides, snail caviar targets a very up-market niche of enthusiasts who have appreciated this product ever since it was first launched in the early 80's.



VENDACE CAVIAR

A higher value is attributed to the caviar obtained from the vendace (coregonus albula), a freshwater fish particularly appreciated in North European countries.
HERRING CAVIAR

Herring caviar has a most original flavour that is briny and sweet. It is widely consumed in the Baltic countries and in Spain. It is usually presented in oil and accompanied with lemon to enhance its characteristics, which include a pronounced crunchiness.
LUMPFISH ROE

There are of course other alternatives to caviar which bear a greater resemblance to the original. A true connoisseur will have no problem distinguishing them but they are not necessarily intended to be fobbed off as authentic sturgeon roe. They are merely to be considered as "variations on the theme" endowed with their own peculiar organoleptic properties. The most affordable and widely consumed example is that of lumpfish roe, which may be either red or black, and rich in omega-3. It is less salty than the original caviar and, for this reason, is used in various recipes along with other ingredients rather than being served alone.


SALMON CAVIAR

Soft roe, a pronounced flavour and a rich fattiness are the typical characteristics of salmon caviar, possibly the best known alternative to that of sturgeon. Affordably priced, its colour can vary from pink to bright red. It is often used as a garnish.

TASTING TIPS

Whichever alternative caviar you intend to taste, we advise you to do it in the most traditional and simple way possible. Place one spoonful of the product on freshly toasted and buttered bread. Then, choose the right wine to accompany it: nothing but Champagne, Prosecco or a quality vodka.

http://bit.ly/2vFcGjF

Wylie Dufresne's First Ever Cookbook is an ode to wd-50


WYLIE DUFRESNE'S FIRST EVER COOKBOOK IS AN ODE TO WD-50





Fans of Wylie Dufresne lamenting the shuttering of his groundbreaking wd~50 restaurant will finally be awarded the chance to re-live the excitement and artistry behind the iconic New York institution in the famous American chef's long awaited debut cookbook.

Due out in October, wd~50 The Cookbook, co-authored by Peter Meehan, pays testament to the pioneering restaurant on Lower East Side, featuring the unique stories behind it alongside the incredible dishes which were instrumental in putting it on the culinary map.

Food lovers will get the chance to drool over Wylie’s iconic creations in stunning photos, recreate his dishes and enjoy stories recounted from the last days of the restaurant, serving as a reminder of a moment in time in New York's evolving food culture.

A look inside:









A restaurant that was so distinct it famously inspired New York Times critic Pete Wells to compare its closing after 11 years to that of the music venue CBGB, “with way nicer bathrooms."

These days Dufresne is playing with donuts at downtown Brooklyn shop Du's - find out more hereabout how he's applying molecular gastronomy to donuts.

Can't wait? Try out these Dufresne recipes in the meantime, for crab roll, salt 'n vinegar chips, celery mayonnaise or langoustine and popcorn.

http://bit.ly/2vEaeKg

How to Sear Anything Perfectly


HOW TO SEAR ANYTHING PERFECTLY



Getting the perfect sear on a piece of meat or fish is so satisfying. Not only does it look great, but the flavour is enhanced tenfold too: it’s all down to the Maillard reaction between amino acids and reducing sugars.

So just how do you get the perfect sear? The video below, a collaboration between Tasty and ChefSteps, one of the best cooking resources on the web, shows you how.

There are plenty of tips and tricks: like salting skin to ensure a deeper sear and of course making sure that your pan is smoking hot.

If you want to get perfect crispy chicken or fish skin, a deliciously golden pork chop, an amazing crust on a piece of steak, then this video should be all you need.
WATCH MORE CHEFSTEPS VIDEOS NOW!



http://bit.ly/2vkRxQH

Monday, August 28, 2017

Chef: 12 Reasons Why the Industry Has to Change


CHEF: 12 REASONS WHY THE INDUSTRY HAS TO CHANGE





Chef Paul Sorgule, who often writes for us here at FDL, shares some great insights into what it means to be a chef or cook in the industry today, over on his Harvest America Ventures blog. Something of a kitchen veteran, he has a real grasp of the psychology of the job and what it takes to excel.

So, we wanted to highlight his latest post: “I Love Being a Chef but I’m Mad as Hell.” In it, Sorgule lists eight reasons why he loves the job, but also lists another 12 things about the industry that drive him crazy and need to change.
READ MORE FROM CHEF PAUL SORGULE

Take a look at his list below and if you think he’s missing anything, let us know over on our Facebook page.

1. I LOVE BEING A CHEF QUITE SIMPLY BECAUSE I HAVE BECOME COMPETENT

2. I LOVE BEING A CHEF BECAUSE I CONTINUE TO BE INTRIGUED BY THE CHARACTER OF THOSE WHO ARE SERIOUS ABOUT THE CRAFT

3. I LOVE BEING A CHEF BECAUSE I KNOW THAT I CAN HELP TO MAKE PEOPLE HAPPY, EVEN WHEN THE ODDS SEEM AGAINST THAT

4. I LOVE BEING A CHEF BECAUSE I AM ABLE TO PAY RESPECT TO INGREDIENTS AND CREATE FOOD THAT IS BEAUTIFUL AND GRATIFYINGLY DELICIOUS

5. I LOVE BEING A CHEF BECAUSE EVERY DAY IN THE KITCHEN IS AN OPPORTUNITY TO SEE A TEAM BRING THE IMPOSSIBLE TO FRUITION

6. I LOVE BEING A CHEF BECAUSE THE JOB IS BUILT ON THE SOLID FOOTING OF THOUSANDS OF DEDICATED PROFESSIONALS WHO PREVIOUSLY GAVE MUCH OF THEIR LIVES TO THE CRAFT

7. I LOVE BEING A CHEF BECAUSE I KNOW THAT I EARNED WHERE I AM WITH MY CAREER

8. I LOVE BEING A CHEF BECAUSE I CAN CONTINUE TO LIVE MY PROFESSIONAL LIFE NOW THAT I AM PARTIALLY RETIRED, THROUGH THE SUCCESS OF THOSE WHOM I HELPED TO TRAIN AND TEACH

9. I AM FRUSTRATED AND ANGRY BECAUSE THOSE COOKS WHO ARE SERIOUS AND TALENTED ARE UNABLE TO MAKE A DECENT LIVING

10. I AM FRUSTRATED AND ANGRY BECAUSE THERE IS FAR TOO MUCH MEDIOCRITY IN THIS BUSINESS THAT DROWNS OUT THE EXCELLENT WORK THAT SERIOUS COOKS DO

11. I AM FRUSTRATED AND ANGRY BECAUSE THE TITLE OF CHEF IS GIVEN OUT TOO FREELY TO THOSE WHO HAVE YET TO DEMONSTRATE THAT THEY HAVE EARNED IT

12. I AM FRUSTRATED AND ANGRY BECAUSE FAR TOO MANY RESTAURATEURS LOOK AT THEIR KITCHEN STAFF IN TERMS OF LABOR DOLLARS RATHER THAN PEOPLE WHO WANT TO PERSONIFY THE VERY BEST SKILLS AND ATTITUDE OF A PROFESSIONAL

13. I AM FRUSTRATED AN ANGRY THAT THOSE WHO CHOOSE TO PURSUE A COLLEGE EDUCATION IN CULINARY ARTS ARE SADDLED WITH ABSURB DEBT THAT CAN NEVER BE PAID

14. I AM FRUSTRATED AND ANGRY THAT TOO MANY CULINARY PROGRAMS ARE MORE INTERESTED IN FILLING CLASSROOM SEATS THAN HELPING A STUDENT DECIDE IF THIS PROFESSION IS RIGHT FOR THEM

15. I AM FRUSTRATED AND ANGRY THAT TOO MANY CULINARY GRADUATES ARE UNWILLING TO PAY THEIR DUES TO REALLY LEARN WHAT IT TAKES TO BECOME A CHEF

16. I AM FRUSTRATED AND ANGRY THAT LINE COOKS ARE NEVER GIVEN THE CREDIT THEY DESERVE

17. I AM FRUSTRATED AND ANGRY THAT AMERICA HAS FAILED TO RECOGNISE SERVICE AS AN HONOURABLE PROFESSION

18. I AM FRUSTRATED AND ANGRY WHEN PEOPLE OUTSIDE THE INDUSTRY THINK THAT THE FOOD NETWORK AND SHOWS LIKE HELLS KITCHEN ARE AN ACCURATE PORTRAYAL OF WHAT KITCHEN LIFE IS LIKE

19. I AM ANGRY AND FRUSTRATED THAT CHEFS ARE IGNORED WHEN THEY TALK ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF QUALITY, CHEMICAL FREE, GMO FREE, INGREDIENTS FROM FARMERS AND PRODUCERS WHO ARE PASSIONATE ABOUT THEIR CRAFT

20. I AM FRUSTRATED AND ANGRY THAT SOME LOOK AT THE LIFESTYLE OF A COOK AS SOMETHING THAT IS IMPOSED ON THEM RATHER THAN A CHOICE THAT THEY MAKE BECAUSE THEY LOVE WHAT THEY DO


http://bit.ly/2vCNOZU

Try The Ultimate Recipe for Quiche Lorraine


TRY THE ULTIMATE RECIPE FOR QUICHE LORRAINE





Let's talk quiche. Perhaps the most famous of them all is the recipe for quiche Lorraine, named so after the Lorraine region of northeast France, where it originated.

If you'd love make this French delicacy, we'd love to share our recipe for quiche Lorraine. This quiche makes an excellent option for lunch or brunch. The best part is that it can be served at room temperature, which makes it ideal to take along on picnics.

WHAT YOU'LL NEED TO MAKE QUICHE LORRAINE




At its most basic, quiche Lorraine requires just cubed ham, eggs, cream and cheese. Our version adds a few other gourmet ingredients which takes to over the top. 

You'll need:

  • ham
  • prosciutto
  • onion
  • garlic
  • mixed herbs
  • eggs
  • Gruyere cheese
  • cream
  • salt 
  • pepper

A homemade crust made with just four ingredients - flour, butter, eggs, salt - makes it absolutely irresistible.

Get the complete recipe for quiche Lorraine here.



Tip: Accompany your quiche Lorraine with a delectable green salad laced with pomegranate seeds.




http://bit.ly/2vCH3r2

Zurich, Switzerland: a City Tasting Tour with Daniel Humm


ZURICH, SWITZERLAND: A CITY TASTING TOUR WITH DANIEL HUMM


Heading to Zurich? Here's a guide to places to eat and drink in Zurich from chef Daniel Humm of 'Eleven Madison Park', New York.
Zurich, Switzerland: a City Tasting Tour with Daniel Humm


Zurich consistently ranks top in global polls for the world’s most liveable cities and, after a short break there, it’s easy to say why. There’s a relaxed feel generally, the air is clean, the lake sparkling and people seem to contentedly go about their business and daily life knowing that they have it better than many other places.

The city’s most famous culinary son has to be Daniel Humm, maestro at Eleven Madison Park in New York - the winner of the World 50 Best Restaurants 2017 - and he kindly recommended Kronenhalle and Odeon Café as must-visits. Here’s a look at them, along with three other dining options.
KRONENHALLE

Kronenhalle has been a Zurich institution since 1924, with gold lettering marking the name on a slightly austere exterior, while inside it’s all warm wood-panelled rooms, lace curtains, stained glass, brass lamps and white linen tablecloths. The clientele seems old school and moneyed, happy to be served by white-jacketed waiters and waitresses in black dresses with white pinnies, dishing up Swiss classics, many tableside.

The strength of the Swiss Franc generally means that dining out is expensive, pretty much everywhere in Zurich. Here the lunchtime veal special comes in generous slices in a rich golden jus - pickled cucumbers and tomatoes cut through the richness in a potato salad that accompanies. It's one of the cheapest lunch main courses at 46 CHF - around 40 euro - but they do offer more meat or salad.

Kronenhalle
Rämistrasse 4, 8001 Zürich
Website


ODEON CAFÉ

Another Humm recommendation is again a historical spot which has been serving for more than a century. Café Odeon opened in 1911 and its breath-taking Art Nouveau interior is still a sight to behold, even after restoration. Everyone who has counted in Zurich has eaten there, from James Joyce to Einstein, picking from a menu that is high on comfort. That means Rösti Balls stuffed with Gruyèreand served with sour cream dip – luckily the nearby mountains let you walk it off. ‘Fischer’s Fritz’ brings deep-fried pieces of perch from Lake Zurich served with brilliant tartare sauce.

Odeon Café
Limmatquai 2, 8001 Zurich
Website
THE RESTAURANT, DOLDER GRAND

Heiko Nieder oversees The Restaurant, the simply-named but stunning venue for some of Switzerland’s finest contemporary cuisine. Tasting menus at dinner allow Nieder and team to show why they are one of the most exciting tables anywhere, with impeccable Brittany lobster served with marinated rhubarb, cucumber, ginger, sorrel and vanilla. Another standout is steamed line-caught Arctic hake with basil, wasabi and woodruff. To finish, strawberries multiple ways with buckwheat, tarragon and Aji Amarillo are a sublime, light way to end an exceptional meal.

The Restaurant, Dolder Grand
Kurhausstrasse 65, 8032 Zurich
Website


KANTOREI

Kantorei sits in the heart of the old town, overlooking an ancient fountain and adjoining a 15th century house that was once home to three former mayors. Their meatloaf is not what many would expect and is more like a cured luncheon meat, but serves well as a light-ish lunch alongside a bacon, cucumber and potato salad and dish of Wholegrain mustard with a serious kick. Elsewhere the menu encompasses Swiss classics with occasional innovative touches.

Kantorei
Neumarkt 2 8001 Zürich
Website
FOOD TRUCKS

At the different end of the spectrum comes the burgeoning food truck scene in the form of the Street Food Festival. The diversity of trucks and cuisines reflect the city, with every flavour imaginable from Peruvian to Tibetan, Australian to Japanese. This being Switzerland, it’s beautifully-organised and spotlessly clean, while a big circus ten features live bands and plenty of indoor seating. Outside is where the main action is, however, the challenge being how to choose what to eat next. My standout, a simple but delicious genuine Swiss goulash, served in a bread bowl. Fantastic.


http://bit.ly/2vBIRRe

Saturday, August 26, 2017

Like a Painting: Food Still Lifes by Simona Rizzo





LIKE A PAINTING: FOOD STILL LIFES BY SIMONA RIZZO


A selection of pictures from 'Nature morte', a food photography project by Simona Rizzo, who captures food in photos that look amazingly like paintings.

In an age in which Social Media is invaded by hastily taken photographs of food, Simona Rizzo's work goes against the current trend. The young Italian photographer offers a refined and accurate interpretation of food photography, whose evident aspiration is to recall the great masters of art history, such as Caravaggio.



Simona Rizzo approaches with passion the topic of food with her still life photography. We got the chance to meet her through her on-going project titled Nature morte, which she has been running since 2012. We have interviewed Simona Rizzo about her project, its execution, and her interest in food photography. Here are some amazing pictures of Nature morte, click on the images to enlarge.

What first sparked your interest in still life photography and food?
My interest in food photography stems from a need or simple desire to try to create images that are able to effectively express the natural goodness of the ingredients I was used to cooking and eating every day. That of still life photography was a somewhat different matter: my interest in this genre (not only in photography) is a longstanding one. I believe it dates back to when I observed the Caravaggio's Canestra di frutta (Caravaggio's basket of fruit) for the first time when I was ten years old. I was unable to understand what it was about a simple basket of fruit that fired me with such enthusiasm to want to draw it.



How did the idea of this project come about and how has it been developed?
At first, I wanted to experiment a new photography technique so I started to shoot simple objects using the light painting technique. This technique enables you to decide how, what and how much light to give to the scene, by creating "pictorial" effects that are often interesting. I was enthusiastic about it right from the start. I thought it was important and natural to exploit the expressive potential of this technique and to use it to enhance the compositional aspects in which light (and lack of light) are a fundamental element. Hence the project of my still lifes in pictorial light.

What are your main sources of inspiration in photography and everyday life?
The great still life painters of the XVI-XVII centuries, Caravaggio in particular, for the composition and organisation of space according to the rules of golden section proportions. And Francisco de Zurbarán of the Spanish school of the “Siglo de oro” (Golden Age) for his use of light and ability to render the physical characteristics of materials perfectly, such as their colours and textures.



How did you define and develop the process of selecting the various components making up your images?
The intention to recover such an "ancient" topic as still life through photography is actually dictated by a desire to address universal themes which are just as relevant as ever today: the fragility of life and love, ephemeral beauty and the rapid and inevitable passage of time - Tempus Fugit. Citrus fruits, figs and dipladenia express the perfumes and colours of my home region, Salento, in Southern Italy.

Have you encountered any difficulties in preparing and completing your project?
There were no real difficulties but there have certainly been some shots that have required a more lengthy and complex preparation. For example, the decision to include insects and butterflies in some scenes has called for the assistance of an entomologist.

Do you consider your work to be complete as it is or do you think there will be a sequel?
My project is not yet complete and is still being developed. More images have been conceived and designed in the form of "sketches" and these will soon be produced.

What about publications, exhibitions or future projects regarding food?
Certainly, one of the most important collaborations in this respect is already in course with Alidem. Besides, a recipe book project has just got off the ground, in collaboration with an important chef in Turin. ---Is there any particular project or food photographer from Italy or elsewhere who has attracted your attention or you consider to be an icon? SM I greatly admire the work of Julia Hetta and Sharon Core.




The Nature Morte by Simona Rizzo are part of the Alidem collection, a Milan-based Italian gallery representing a highly diversified group of authors, which selects and sells photographic works. Constantly being developed and extended, this collection is fruit of collaborations with curators, critics and business professionals.


http://bit.ly/2vfexjL

15 of the Worst Restaurant Customers Ever

Here are 15 of the worst and rudest restaurant customers ever, as described by chefs and severs. http://bit.ly/2jXxz6D